Assessment Details HSS8005 Quantitative Methods Stream B: Geographical Information Systems

 

 

Assessment Details

HSS8005 Quantitative Methods

Stream B: Geographical Information Systems

 

Assessment

Part 1 (35%)

Tourism is a major component of New Zealand’s industry and directly employs 7.5% of its population. The general consensus among New Zealander’s is that tourism has grown in recent years. However, we need specific data to determine how much tourism has grown, and in which areas. This is very important for planning and managing tourism, including providing adequate infrastructure, planning buildings, and minimizing environmental impacts. For the first part of the assessment, you are required to create the following three maps:

Map A: A map of tourist numbers for each territorial authority (TLA) in 1997.

Map B: A map of tourist numbers for each TLA in 2017.

Map C: A map showing the change between 1997 and 2017.

 

Each map should have an appropriate caption. The student then needs to write a section of text that describes the spatial patterns of change shown in the maps and any potential implications of these results. For example, you may wish to note areas of largest tourist growth and comment on the implications this may have for planning and environmental impacts. This section of text should be no longer than 500 words. Captions are NOT included within this word count. You are NOT expected to reference academic literature for this report. Instead, the focus is on producing good quality maps, which effectively convey information, and demonstrating that you can describe and interpret these maps.

 

Part 2 (65%)

Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park has had one of the greatest increases in tourist numbers in New Zealand. It is an area of outstanding natural beauty, which means it attracts hundreds of thousands of international visitors each year and many of these visits are focused on a very small area. As such, there is a need to monitor changes in the park, in order to minimise damage and to plan for the future. For the second part of the assessment, you are required to create the following four maps, which explore these issues:

Map 1: A map showing the built environment in Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park in the 1960/1970s.

Map 2: A map showing the built environment & proglacial lakes in Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park in the 2010s.

Map 3: A map showing the change in visitor numbers to hiking huts in Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park, between July 1981-82 and July 2001-02.

Map 4: A map showing the topography of the study area and areas for potential future building.

Further details of what to include in each map are provided in the relevant practical instructions. Each map should have an appropriate caption. The student then needs to write a section of text that describes the main changes in the built environment (roads, buildings etc) and proglacial lakes at Mount Cook, between the 1960/70s and the 2010s. They should also describe the changes in visitor numbers to the huts in the area and discuss potential sites for future building around Aoraki / Mount Cook. They should note any potential implications of

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2020/21

Postgraduate Research Training and Researcher Development Programme

 

these results e.g. huts receiving more visitors may need more facilities. This section of text should be no longer than 1000 words. Captions are NOT included within this word count. You are NOT expected to reference academic literature for this report. Instead, the focus is on producing good quality maps, which effectively convey information, and demonstrating that you can describe and interpret these maps.

 

Assessment of the reports will be judged on the following criteria:

•       quality and appropriateness of the maps produced; •       quality of the interpretation of what they show; and

•       how well they are described to the reader.  These criteria are listed in order of importance.

 

Deadline

Submit a digital copy of the assessment via Canvas by 16.00, Wednesday 5th May 2021. A paper copy is not required. The submission link is on the Canvas module, under Assignments. It is recommended that you submit your work as a pdf (rather than a Word document), as occasionally the formatting can be altered when uploading Word documents with a large number of figures to Canvas. You can convert a Word document to pdf by going to File>Save As and selecting ‘pdf’ from the drop down options under the file name.

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