Cultural Imagination of Gender Draft Essay Questions

MODLM0023 Cultural Imagination of Gender

 

Draft Essay Questions 20-21

 

Essay length: 5000 words

 

Please note that these questions are subject to approval by the External Examiner.

 

Your essay needs to take a comparative approach and can draw on texts from the course as well as other cultural sources.

 

  1. To what extent does psychoanalysis enable us to understand the ways in which gender norms are constructed?

 

  1. Consider the legacy of Freudian psychoanalysis on gender studies.

 

  1. How have representations of the male and female psyche been represented in culture?

 

  1. ‘Like gender, love is also a cultural construct.’ To what extent do the texts that you have studies support this statement?

 

  1. ‘Critical masculinity studies seeks to answer the question “How do men get away with it?”’ (Terrell Carver). To what extent do you agree with Carver’s pithy description of the field? This question should be answered with reference to theoretical and conceptual work in the field.

 

  1. Discuss the view that critical work on men and masculinity can hinder, rather than help, feminist goals. This question should be answered with reference to theoretical and conceptual work in the field.

 

  1. What role does gender play in the cultural imagination of the nation? Your answer may include some theoretical discussion of this question, but it should also include close reading of at least TWO literary texts or films.

 

  1. To what extent does ‘doing masculinity’ in literature and/or cinema involve artistic form as well as content? Your answer may include some theoretical discussion of this question, but it should include close reading of at least TWO literary texts or films.

 

  1. In what ways, if any, does the critique of patriarchy articulated in Simone de Beauvoir’sThe Second Sex remain relevant today?

 

  1. Discuss the significance of Beauvoir’s work for later generations of feminists. In your answer, refer to the work of at least TWO feminist writers, thinkers, or artists who responded to her work following the publication of The Second Sex(1949).

 

  1. Discuss the ways in which queer form reinforces queer thought or representation, with reference to two or more textual or visual works.

 

  1. ‘[S]omeone, or something, is queer when s/he or it challenges the social processes that consolidate and normalize gendered, sexual, raced, and classed identities’. (BESSETTE) Examine the challenges mounted against normative social processes and identities in two or more textual or visual works.

 

  1. Explore the interrelations between gender, sexuality and/or the body, and systems of power, as represented in Testo Junkie and one or more textual or visual works.

 

  1. ‘[I]f we return to the root of the word queer […] we can see that the word itself “twists,” with a twist that allows us to move between sexual and social registers’ (AHMED). To what extent does queer transformation involve spatial and social reorientation in Tomboy? Answer with reference to one or more other textual or visual works.

 

  1. In what ways is gender related to clothing in at least two of the works studied in the unit?

 

  1. To what extent and how do transgender bodies reveal and/or challenge the discursive constitution of gender identities? Discuss comparatively in relation to at least two different works studied.

 

  1. ‘The off-white gangsters of the 1990s helped to shore up a nostalgic construction of white masculinity’ (Ennis). Discuss, in relation to Goodfellas.

 

  1. Discuss Siebert’s idea that in relation to the mafia ‘masculinity, which is erroneously taken to be a “natural” given, appears in reality a somewhat difficult goal to achieve’. How is masculinity ‘achieved’ and performed in The Godfather and/or  Goodfellas?

 

 

Writing a Dissertation – A simple guide

Writing a Dissertation – A simple guide

Section One

  1. Introduction 10%

You will need to introduce your topic here.

  • State the research area of interest.

What is the research topic/ subject area /issues/problems/motivations?

Why is the important? Why should it be of interest to the reader/ academic community/ the society? What will this add to the field of study.

How are you going to accomplish the task? Is it quantitatively or qualitatively?

State your expected contribution(s).

  • State the research questions:

This can be 2, 3, 4 or more depending on the expected results/ gap/contributions/significance of the research.

  • Or your hypotheses

Background of the study (context of your study) 2%   – (optional)

Give some background study to your research:

This can be discussions on the context of your study

The origin of your topic of interest

The motivations for your interest

 

  1. Literature review 18%
  • Or your hypotheses

 

  1. Research Method: Quantitative or qualitative           15%

Discussion of research methodology

Access to data

Research data analysis and instruments

Any anticipated challenges and how these will/have been overcome

 

Limitations

Ethical consideration

 

  1. Findings / Results 40%

 

Findings/results/and Interpretation of data analysis

 

  1. Discussions (optional) 10%- 5%

 

  1. Conclusion 15%

Implications of your study and contributions to the body of knowledge

  • Recommendation for further study

 

REFERENCES/ BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

Section Two

Some guides in developing your research topic and writing

It may be that the easiest way to begin to hone in on a specific topic is to go back through all of the lecture slides, notes and assignments that you have completed so far. Was there a topic that you were particularly interested in? Was there a concept that you thought could have been developed further?

You can also start by looking at relevant journals and publications until you find a more explicit direction.

 

Writing your proposal and dissertation

Depending upon the referencing system preferred by your university department, you will need the following information:

  • Book/Journal title
  • Author(s)
  • Editor(s) (edited books only)
  • Chapter Title
  • Page(s)
  • URL (for online sources only)
  • Publisher

 

*However, majority of your citations should be journal articles.

 

Business Law Project

 

 

Note: All coursework must be submitted electronically via Turnitin, unless otherwise specified. If you are unable to submit by the deadline you must apply for extension or deferral due to mitigating circumstances – forms are available from the Student Advice Centre. Information on penalties and late submissions can be found at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-supportoffice/deferral-of-assessments.aspx

 

Please consult Blackboard for the most up-to-date information on assessment deadlines and return dates. (Also see section 15).

 

 

 

 

Leicester Castle Business School

 

Our Mission Our Vision Our Values
 

To transform lives in our global community of students, staff and partners through outstanding education and research

To go beyond business as usual by fostering creative, distinctive and pioneering solutions to real-world

problems

To promote the public good through critical analysis of the purpose of business and through active engagement in initiatives aimed at tackling business, social and community challenges

 

Through our unsurpassed

commitment to the public

good and transformational scholarship, we will position ourselves as the definition of a 21st century global Business

School

 

LEADERSHIP:

Confidence and courage to shape a better future  INTEGRITY: Taking personal pride in our work

CREATIVITY: Thinking beyond the usual and

embracing ideas

GLOBAL

MINDEDNESS: Finding

opportunities in our

diversity

COMMUNITY: Realising the purpose and power of business

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS PAGE

 

  1. The module team……………………. 4
  2. Module aims………………………….. 4
  3. How it’s going to be delivered……. 5
  4. How this module relates to your programme of study……………………. 5
  5. How this module enhances your employability…………………………….. 6
  6. Your responsibility………………….. 6
  7. Enhancing Research Skills – Dissertation Workshops………………. 7
  8. Module resource…………………….. 8
  9. Blackboard and module communications………………………… 8
  10. The Dissertation Brief……………… 8
  11. Our engagement with you……….. 8
  12. Guidelines for Ethical Research…. 8
  13. Fieldwork Abroad………………….. 9
  14. Data Safekeeping and Availability 9
  15. Further Information……………… 10

USEFUL LINKS AND CONTACTS…….. 16

Appendix A – Activity Symbols…….. 18

 

 

 

             

 

1.    The module team

 

The module team will consist of the following members of academic staff. Advice and feedback hours for each member are provided on Blackboard in the Staff Contacts section.

 

Dr Samuel Komakech HU3.54 skomakech@dmu.ac.uk Ext. 8369
Dr Arina Cirstea EW1.03a arina.cirstea@dmu.ac.uk Ext. 6351

 

In addition, each student will be allocated a supervisor. The profile and research and teaching interests of the supervisors are available on DMU website.

 

2.    Module aims

 

This 60 credit optional module requires students to take an independent and selfstructured approach to their learning.

 

The aim of the module is to:

 

  • Allow students to apply the theoretical knowledge gained in the research methods in a practical situation by carrying out research into issues relevant to accounting and finance.
  • Allow students to undertake a sustained piece of work, which is supervised, selfdirected and leads to the production of the dissertation.
  • Allow students to focus on a particular topic, carry out an investigation and writeup their findings and discussion in a 12,000 to 15,000 words dissertation.
  • Enable students to develop and use skills such as time-management and networking with other people along with the ability to express their ideas in the form of a coherent written text.

 

 

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

 

By the end of this module students will:

 

  • Be able to evaluate the variety of research methods available and select those appropriate to a particular research topic, and to develop a relevant research design.
  • Develop the capacity for independent and self-managed learning; and to be able to carry out a self-directed and independent work to produce a research dissertation which focuses on an area within accounting and finance.
  • Demonstrate the ability to locate, identify, critically review and appropriately summarise a range of literature pertaining to a critical area of accounting and finance.
  • Be able to undertake research into an issue, use appropriate techniques to analyse the data/information gathered, and produce a critical discourse of the results obtained. (GGC 4)
  • Develop skills of critical analysis, evaluation and appraisal of data/information; and to be able to analyse, reflect and draw reasonable conclusions.
  • Be able to employ numeric skills to conduct research; and to appreciate the current DMU policy on human research ethics.

 

 

  Introduced, Practiced, Assessed
Written communication Assessed
Interpersonal communication Practiced
Planning and organisation Practiced, Assessed
Oral presentation Practiced
Teamworking Not Applicable
Adaptability Practiced
Problem solving Practiced
Numeracy Practiced, Assessed
Computer skills Practiced

 

 

3.    How it’s going to be delivered

 

The dissertation work largely follows an independent and self-structured approach to their learning. However, to help students in preparing for writing and submitting their dissertation, a series of dissertation support workshops will be run. The workshops are aimed at enabling students achieve a well organised, logically presented and appropriately referenced submission. During the workshops, students will engage critically with their research topics and the materials under consideration. The workshops should help the students achieve a writing style which is appropriate for the dissertation, which they will develop through considerable reading, writing and reflection. The workshops will cover several key issues regarding dissertation writing, but not all the issues. The students will still need to make use of other supports available to them, e.g. the supervisors.

 

The dissertation support workshops of this module will cover:

  • Selecting a research topic.
  • Researching the chosen topic – reviewing literature; the CARS checklist; compiling list of references; note-taking; expressing yourself clearly; academic writing.
  • Planning and analysis – structure of the dissertation; developing your ideas.
  • Drafting, re-drafting and editing your dissertation – attention to detail and selfassessment; supervision and supervisory meetings.
  • Preparing the final submission – presentation and submission requirements; submission dateline.

 

The Faculty is committed to providing an equal learning experience for every DMU student through the use of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  Examples of the ways in which we do this include a focus on flexible ways of learning, providing flexible study resources such as by recording lectures, and by using a variety of assessment methods.

 

4.    How this module relates to your programme of study

 

This module is optional; however the grade attained in this 60 credit module is key to determining the classification band in which your postgraduate degree award falls. This is important for all students registered on the MSc Applied Accounting; MSc Accounting and Finance; MSc Forensic Accounting; MSc International Banking and Finance; and MSc International Finance and Investment who undertake the module.

 

The module requires prior knowledge from ACFI5070 Research Methods module and other taught modules on your programme. The prior knowledge is useful in selecting the dissertation topic, and the research design and methods of data collection and analysis techniques to use.

 

The module should enable a graduate to acquire some of the research knowledge and skills that would be relevant to a research degree course.

 

 

5.    How this module enhances your employability

 

In this module, you will start acquiring and practicing transferable skills, such as: independent working, time management skills, project planning and management skills, networking skills, communication skills, etc., which are applicable to the workplace.

 

DMU has great ambitions for its students and alumni and we want you to have opportunities that match your ambitions. We offer a wide range of work experiences and now we want to make these even better.

 

#DMUworks is our fresh new programme to fit around what students, alumni and employers need, focusing on work experience opportunities that may be short, long, based in the UK or abroad – with options to suit different circumstances and aspirations. You can find out and sign up for #DMUworks opportunities on MyGateway.

 

You can also find out further information about our projects by visiting the following webpage: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/careers-and-employability/careersand-employability.aspx

 

 

6.    Your responsibility

 

Students are expected to attend and participate in all timetabled activities, including lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical sessions.  Students are also encouraged to fully participate in the academic and cultural life of the Faculty and University, including guest lectures, seminars, public debates and external visits.

 

As students, your responsibilities are: Preparation: Complete the required readings before coming to each timetabled session on this module and to undertake the required follow-up work.

 

Participation: Participate in the Dissertation Support Workshops, as well as any group activities that will be given during the workshops. To assist your engagement in the workshops, you should come prepared by writing down ideas, quotes, or concepts from the reading list that you find interesting as well as thought provoking.  You should come prepared so that you can fully engage in discussions and activities during the workshops.

 

Respect: Throughout your studies it is important that you treat other students with respect as well as engaging in a respectful manner with academic staff. It is imperative that you listen to others and treat their contributions with respect, even if you disagree with them.  In particular it is important that:

  • You are respectful of your peers’ learning and resist talking through seminars, workshops and lectures.
  • You do not answer your phone unless it is an emergency.
  • If you are late, then please take the first available seat and settle yourself as quietly as possible.

 

The student charter sets out commitments from the university to students, from students to the university, and from the Students’ Union to students. You can consult it at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-resources/studentcharter/student-charter.aspx

 

The module, teaching and assessment team will contribute to this environment by:

  • Treating all students with respect.
  • Welcoming diverse viewpoints, experiences, and interpretations of the class materials.
  • Challenging your thinking, beliefs, and analysis of issues, concepts, and ideas in this class.

 

Please refer to the Dissertation Brief for responsibilities that are specific to the dissertation and supervision process.

 

 

7.    Enhancing Research Skills – Dissertation Workshops

 

During the dissertation, you will attend a series of workshops that have been organised to help support the key phases of the dissertation. Attendance of these workshops is compulsory as they are designed to help you progress through your dissertation process smoothly and add to the one-to-one supervision sessions that you will have.

 

There will be four dissertation workshops, in weeks 22 and 31 scheduled as follows:

 

Week Facilitator Topic
Week 22

Tuesday/Wednesday

02/03 March 2021

Samuel Komakech 1.    Introduction to the dissertation, key deadlines

2.    Supervisor Request Form

Week 22

Friday

05 March 2021

Samuel Komakech 1.    Literature Review

2.    Preparing your first meeting: research topic

Week 31

Tuesday/Wednesday

04/05 May 2021

Samuel Komakech 1.    Ethical approval process

2.    Research methods

3.    Submitting your works

Week 31

Friday

07 May 2021

Arina Cirstea 1.  Critical writing and academic expression

2.  Using evidence in your dissertation

 

 

 

8.    Module resource

 

The learning resources list for the dissertation workshops is available online and can be accessed through: https://rl.talis.com/3/dmu/lists/27344CE9-D388-3BE8-6F5BAABD59997683.html?lang=en-US&login=1. This list will be updated during the course as necessary.

 

In addition there are a number of databases that are available through the library, which will provide the relevant resources you require to complete and submit the dissertation.

 

 

9.    Blackboard and module communications

 

Important information relating to this module can be found on Blackboard. This includes information on the module, workshops and seminar materials, all communications and announcements, as well as the procedure for submitting assignments via TurnitinUK.

 

You can access Blackboard by going to this link: https://vle.dmu.ac.uk. Login using the same username and password that you have for access to the University’s computer services.

 

Further information on Blackboard can be accessed from the Centre for Enhancing Learning through Technology (CELT): http://celt.our.dmu.ac.uk/blackboard/

 

If you have any difficulties logging into any computer on campus, then you should contact the Help Desk located on the 1st floor of the Kimberlin Library. In addition, you might contact the ITMS helpline (+44 (0)116 250 6050) or send an email to itmsservicedesk@dmu.ac.uk noting your name and degree programme).

 

10.         The Dissertation Brief

 

Please refer to the Dissertation Brief, which is available on Blackboard.

 

11.         Our engagement with you

 

The feedback that we receive from you is vital to the student experience. We gather this feedback through module and course surveys as well as via meetings and engagement with student representatives. Module and programme teams reflect on the comments that students provide and take action accordingly.

 

12.         Guidelines for Ethical Research

 

The research ethics: principles, process and paperwork has become more important than ever. Students who do not gain ethics approval before commencing their research will fail the dissertation module.

 

Please follow the procedures and forms for applying for ethics authorisation in the Faculty of Business and Law. Only the relevant forms will be accepted; therefore, please ensure that you use the correct form when applying for ethics approval. The procedures and process for applying for ethics approval and the and forms can be found at the link: http://dmu.ac.uk/research/ethics-and-governance/faculty-specific-procedures/bal.aspx.

 

All students who wish to undertake research activities will need to follow this process to determine if ethical approval is needed, and (if so) apply for such authorisation before commencing their research:

 

  • The appropriate ethical approval form must be used.

 

  • All forms must be signed by the researcher and (in the case of students) a supervisor.

 

  • The application should be accompanied by the relevant documentation that will allow the reviewer(s) to understand the nature of the project and the possible ethical issues.

 

All details concerning the new process and relevant forms can be found from the link above. The link contains the following key information, which are relevant to this module:

 

  • Faculty ethics guidelines; and

 

  • Faculty approval process – Undergraduates and Post Graduate Taught.

 

  • Preliminary Review (or Triage) forms – All undergraduate, post graduate taught and PhD students must initially complete this triage application form (BAL Preliminary Ethics (Triage) Application Form UG and PGT (July 2019)). Completion of this form will assess whether the applicant will need to go on in turn to complete a full Ethics application form. (Please follow the Faculty ethics guidelines (above) for where to submit your form.)

 

Ethics Application Forms

 

There is a separate application for Undergraduate and Post graduate Taught. For this module, you must use the BAL Ethics Application UG PGT Form (September 2020). Please remember that you only need to complete a full application if advised to do so.

 

If you have received ethical approval but wish to amend your study after approval, this will need further approval. Please complete an amendments form.

 

There also sample data collection templates available at the link, i.e.:

  • Participant information sheet.
  • Consent from.

 

NOTE: All forms must be completed electronically. Manually completed forms are not accepted. 

 

13.         Fieldwork Abroad

 

If you consider that fieldwork abroad is manageable, and an important aspect of your dissertation methodology, then the arrangements must be agreed in some detail with your supervisor and receive their approval before you travel to that country where the fieldwork is to be carried out.  Any fieldwork carried out abroad, which has not been agreed with your supervisor, will not be accepted as a contribution to your dissertation.

 

14.         Data Safekeeping and Availability

 

It is essential that all data gathered is kept safe and is protected in accordance with the ethical considerations appropriate to the study undertaken.  It is also essential that should the supervisor, module, or programme leader request to view collected data, these are made available to them.  Such requests will generally be related to the assessment of the work.

15.         Further Information

 

Attendance: Attendance and engagement in all learning activities is expected in all Faculty of Business and Law modules. For absences due to illness, lasting up to six consecutive calendar days, students must inform tutors, whose classes they are missing, of the reasons for their absence. For absences of seven consecutive days or more due to illness a medical certificate must be submitted to the Faculty Student Advice Centre. Student who wish the illness to be taken into account in relation to an assessment of work must follow the procedures relating to deferral.

 

Extensions: Extensions to relevant deadlines are only granted where there is a satisfactory explanation provided in advance. The Module Leader may, on the advice of the supervisor, be able to grant a short extension to the deadline for submission. In exceptional circumstances, longer extensions can be granted by the Associate Dean Academic or their nominee. You may apply for an extension by completing an extension request form available from the Student Advice Centre.

 

Submission deadlines are published in order to ensure equity for students and to facilitate sound administration by assessors.  It is expected that such deadlines will be met at all times.  Only in exceptional cases, and with the prior consent of the Dissertation Module Leader or Programme Leader, will extensions to deadlines be granted.

 

If in advance of the given submission date you consider that you need an extension of time, you must:

  • Discuss the matter with your supervisor, explaining why you consider that an extension is necessary, in order to obtain his or her support. An extension will not be considered, without the support of your supervisor.  Appropriate evidence must be provided to the supervisor to support any request for extensions (e.g. medical note, etc.).
  • Complete the appropriate Extension Application form and follow the procedures.

 

If you are granted an extension or deferral, the first 28 days of the extension are free, but please note that extensions beyond 28 days may incur a fee.  The Programme Administrator, will contact you in due course should you request an extension.

 

Under exceptional and documented circumstances, you may request a deferral for your dissertation.  Should your request be successful when considered by the appropriate deferral panel, you will be given a new deadline within the next assessment period.  Please note that this will delay your graduation.

 

Unauthorised late submission of assessments: Generally, if an assessment is submitted later than the deadline without an approved extension or deferral the mark received will be capped. If an assessment is submitted 1 to 14 calendar days late the mark for the work will be capped at the pass mark of 50 per cent for postgraduate modules. If an assessment is submitted beyond 14 calendar days late the work will receive a mark of zero per cent.

 

If you submit your dissertation after the published deadline, without an agreed extension or deferral, your mark will be capped to a maximum of 50% (if submission is within 14 days after the published deadline), after this, the dissertation will be marked at 0%.

 

 

 

 

Deferrals

If your circumstances are such that an extension would not be sufficient, or if you feel that, despite being granted an extension, your performance in the dissertation has been seriously impaired, you may apply formally to your faculty panel for a deferral of dissertation. You will have to fill in the appropriate form that is obtainable from the Faculty Student Advice Centre and supply supporting evidence.  Forms should be submitted to the Faculty Student Advice Centre. Further information on the deferrals policy can be consulted at: http://dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-supportoffice/deferral-of-assessments.aspx

 

Reassessment

Students are entitled to one reassessment opportunity in each module, including the dissertation.  Reassessments must be completed within the maximum period of registration of the programme.

 

Reassessment is permitted in relation to fail marks only.  The outcome of a reassessment will be given on a student’s transcript, together with the original fail mark.  A reassessment outcome shall count as a minimum pass mark of 50%.

 

Students must take reassessments when required by the Faculty.

 

 

Style and Referencing: Students in the Faculty of Business and Law follow specific referencing guides for all written work.  Referencing is a key skill you need to demonstrate good academic practice. You must provide references for everything you use to write your dissertation. A reference supports your argument and provides the reader with all the information needed to accurately identify the original source of the authors you have quoted or paraphrased.

 

At Leicester Castle Business School students must follow the Harvard Style of referencing system. The Harvard (Cite Them Right) referencing style should be used for all assignments and projects. Online guidance is provided for the Harvard (Cite Them Right) referencing style via the Cite Them Right Online Tool.

Cite Them Right Online Tool helps students learn the principles of referencing and the concepts of good academic practice and why this is important. The tool also provides guidance on how to reference over 150 source types, all with examples.  To view this guidance, visit: https://library.dmu.ac.uk/refguide. This is the main referencing system used by DMU. There are many systems for the citation of references, but Leicester Castle Business School expects students to use the Harvard (Cite Them Right) system, which is a name and date reference system. There are various variations of the Harvard Style of referencing. Please discuss with your supervisor, which one is the most appropriate and apply it consistently.

 

The dissertation is expressed in a student’s own words. It incorporates the student’s own ideas and judgement.  The student should avoid plagiarism.

  • Always identify clearly direct quotes from published or unpublished work of others (i.e. place them inside quotation marks).
  • Provide full references of sources of work of others in the proper form (Harvard style of referencing).

Where a student paraphrases another person’s ideas or judgement, they must refer to that person in the text (in-text referencing) and include the work in the list of references.

 

Return of submitted work: Normally, all students will be informed via a Blackboard announcement when their assessment is marked. You are strongly encouraged to discuss your written or in some cases audio feedback with your supervisor or Module Leader if you have any questions or concerns. Modules assessed wholly or in part by examination may have generic feedback on examination performance made available via Blackboard.

 

All marks on assessed work are provisional marks only and they will not be confirmed until the Assessment Board meets. Marks and feedback on assessed work will be available within 20 days. The turnaround time does not include weekends, bank holidays or university closure days. (Please note that given the volume of the work assessed in the dissertation, it is not possible for the marks to be available within 20 days of submission. Marks should be available after the Assessment Board has met.) The full Assessment and Feedback policy can be consulted at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/aboutdmu/quality-management-and-policy/academic-quality/learning-teachingassessment/assessment-feedback-policy.aspx

 

Good academic conduct and discipline: All students are expected to adhere to the University’s regulations in relation to expected standards of behaviour. Information on student regulations can be viewed at: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/qualitymanagement-and-policy/academic-quality/taught-programmes-academicregulations/taught-pgms-academic-regulations-homepage.aspx

 

Plagiarism and bad academic practice: De Montfort University’s Academic Regulations describe plagiarism as: “the significant use of other people’s work and the submission of it as though it were one’s own in assessed coursework (such as dissertations, essays, experiments etc.)”.

 

This includes:

  • Copying from another student’s work
  • Copying text from sources such as books or journals without acknowledgement
  • Downloading information and/or text from the Internet and using it without acknowledgement
  • Submitting work which you claim to be your own when it has been produced by a group
  • Submitting group work without acknowledging all contributors.

 

De Montfort University describes bad academic practice as: low level duplication without citation for example errors made through carelessness or misunderstanding; or passing off ideas, data or other information as if originally discovered by the student.

 

Information on academic offences can be found at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-supportoffice/academic-offences.aspx

 

Further advice on academic offences can be obtained by emailing acasupportoffice@dmu.ac.uk Full details can be found in the University regulations http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-supportoffice/student-regulations.aspx

 

Students are reminded that module assessment results are provisional until ratified by the programme management boards and that results released to students can be revised or redacted if there are concerns regarding academic practices.

 

Proofreading: 

If you do use a third party to proofread your work or a professional proofreading service you must discuss this with your supervisor and declare this in a written statement accompanying your work when you submit it for assessment.

 

 

DMU Generic Postgraduate Mark Descriptors:

This is a guide to the criteria used by staff assigning a mark to a piece of postgraduate work.  The final mark awarded to a piece of work will be informed by its predominant correspondence to these descriptors.  The University generic descriptors as well as advice for students can be accessed at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/quality-management-and-policy/academicquality/learning-teaching-assessment/mark-descriptors.aspx. Please refer to Appendix 2 of the Dissertation Brief for the Dissertation Mark Descriptors used for this module.

 

Modules are marked on a range of 0% – 100%.  The DMU mark descriptors are given in the table below.  A mark below 50% indicates a Fail grade (the shaded boxes).

 

 

Mark Range Criteria
90-100% Distinction Demonstrates an exceptional ability and insight, indicating the highest level of technical competence.

The work has the potential to influence the forefront of the subject, and may be of publishable/exhibitable quality.

Relevant generic skills are demonstrated at the highest possible standard.

80-89% Distinction Demonstrates an outstanding ability and insight based on authoritative subject knowledge and a very high level of technical competence.

The work is considered to be close to the forefront of the subject, and may be close to publishable/exhibitable quality.

Relevant generic skills are demonstrated at a very high level.

70-79% Distinction Demonstrates an authoritative, current subject knowledge and a high level of technical competence.

The work is accurate and extensively supported by appropriate evidence.  It may show some originality.  Clear evidence of capacity to reflect critically and deal with ambiguity in the data.

Relevant generic skills are demonstrated at a high level.

60-69%

Merit

Demonstrates a sound, current subject knowledge.  No significant errors in the application of concepts or appropriate techniques.  May contain some minor flaws.

The work is well developed and coherent; may show some originality.  Clear evidence of capacity to reflect critically.

Relevant generic skills are demonstrated at a good level.

50 – 59% Pass Demonstrates satisfactory subject knowledge. Some evident weaknesses; possibly shown by conceptual gaps, or limited use of appropriate techniques.

The work is generally sound but tends toward the factual or derivative.  Limited evidence of capacity to reflect critically.

Relevant generic skills are generally at a satisfactory level.

45 -49%

Marginal Fail

Demonstrates satisfactory subject knowledge to some degree. Some important weaknesses; possibly shown by factual errors, conceptual gaps, or limited use of appropriate techniques.

The work is generally sound but tends toward the factual or derivative.  Little evidence of capacity to reflect critically.

Relevant generic skills are generally at a satisfactory level.

40-44% Demonstrates limited core subject knowledge.  Some important weaknesses; possibly shown by factual errors, conceptual gaps, or limited use of appropriate techniques.

The work lacks sound development.  Little evidence of capacity to reflect critically.

The quality of the relevant generic skills do not meet the requirements of the task.

30-39% Demonstrates inadequate subject knowledge.

The work lacks coherence and evidence of capacity to reflect critically.

The quality of the relevant generic skills do not meet the requirements of the task.

20-29% Demonstrates seriously inadequate knowledge of the subject.

The work contains minimal evidence of awareness of relevant issues or theory.

The quality of the relevant generic skills do not meet the requirements of the task.

10-19% The work is almost entirely lacking in evidence of knowledge of the subject.  No evidence of awareness of relevant issues or theory.

The quality of the relevant generic skills do not meet the requirements of the task.

0-9% The work presents information that is irrelevant and unconnected to the task.

No evident awareness of appropriate principles, theories, evidence and techniques.

 

 

 

How we support you

 

Sometimes things happen that are beyond your control, for example, illness or personal problems.  If things start to affect your studies, you need to let someone know.  There are processes and people to help you.

 

Your personal tutor is an important starting point for help.  He or she will be able to advise you about the various University procedures.  Many things can be dealt with by your Programme Leader. Academic matters within the Faculty are led by the Associate Dean Academic in conjunction with Associate Professor Student Experience. The staff in the Student Advice Centre are there to provide support and guidance.

 

There are in addition a number of sources of help that are listed in the Useful Links and Contacts section below, such as the Student Gateway.

 

USEFUL LINKS AND CONTACTS

 

Careers Service

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/careers-and-employability/careers-andemployability.aspx

 

Counselling and Wellbeing

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/counselling-mental-health-andwellbeing/counselling/counselling.aspx

 

Disability Advice and Support

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/disability-advice-andsupport/disability-advice-and-support.aspx

 

The Student Gateway

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-and-academicservices.aspx

 

Student Finance and Welfare

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-finance-andwelfare/student-finance-and-welfare.aspx

 

Student support

Website: http://dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/student-support/student-support.aspx

 

Students’ Union

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/welcome-to-de-montfort-studentsunion/welcome-to-de-montfort-students-union.aspx

 

Student Advice Centre

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/schools-and-departments/leicester-businessschool/contact-us.aspx

 

Support for Mature Students

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/adjusting-to-studentlife/mature-students.aspx

 

Other Services and Links

 

Academic Appeals

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-supportoffice/academic-appeals.aspx

 

Change in student circumstance (e.g. suspension of studies) –

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-finance-andwelfare/changes-affecting-finances/taking-a-break.aspx

 

Complaints Procedure

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/studentcomplaints/student-complaints-procedure.aspx

 

Information Technology and Media Services (ITMS)

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/professional-services/information-technology-and-mediaservices/service-desk.aspx

 

Nightline

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-resources/it-and-media/24-hour-support.aspx

 

Student Code of Conduct

https://www.dmu.ac.uk/Documents/DMU-students/Academic-Support-Office/Student-Codeof-Conduct.pdf

 

 

Appendix A – Activity Symbols

 

Symbol Type of activity
  This symbol indicates that you have a PowerPoint presentation to watch. This is used mainly for asynchronous lectures and is usually split into two sections; firstly, the theory & secondly the application
  This symbol indicates that you need to read a document. This could be a chapter in a book (all books will be available via e-book from the university library), a journal article or another written source.
  This symbol is used for a specific form of task called a brain dump. A brain dump is simply the act of dumping all the contents of your mind onto paper as one might dump the contents of a bag onto a table.
  This symbol indicates that you will need to watch a third-party video. This could be via YouTube or Box of Broadcast. Any required weblink will be included in the weekly topic summary.
  This symbol indicates that the task is a discussion task. You could be asked to work in a group either in person or virtually to discuss concepts.
  This symbol indicates that you need to think about and write down your thoughts on a topic. This could be anything from a quick mind map to a plan for an essay.
  This symbol indicates that there are a number of questions for you to attempt to ensure that you understand the topic. These could be in either physical or electronic format.
  This symbol indicates that there is a timed activity. This is usually to prepare you for time constrained assessments.
  This symbol indicates a revision activity. This is prepared to allow you to either consolidate your knowledge, confirm your understanding or prepare for a forthcoming assessment.

 

 

 

 

Management

1: Reward Management

explore some challenges associated with reward distribution in the countries that Intel is

located drawing on cultural and local institutional factors.

 

2: Talent Management

provide a critical discussion into the philosophy that underpins the talent management strategy of Intel.

What do you understand by Global talent management and what are the two approaches, which of them resonates with Intel company’s talent management strategy?

 

3: International Staffing Approach

Critically discuss the different approaches to staffing in MNC by referring to relevant theory.

Critically evaluate the current staffing approach used by Intel company.

EFN415 Final Exam

Question 1

Assume the following information exists in

May 2010:AOI = 2600

Dec 2010 SPI Futures = 2660

Rf = 6% pa; Dividend Yield = 4% pa. Illustrate any arbitrage strategy that may be available, discussing the difficulties in implementing it.

(4 marks)

Question 2

  • Compare and contrast active and passive portfolio management.

(3 marks)

Question 3

  • Discuss what an option delta measures and how it may be used for hedging with call and put options.

(4 marks)

Question 4

  • A five-year zero-coupon bond with a face value of $100 is currently yielding 8% pa. Calculate its Duration and Modified Duration. Calculate its change in price for a 2% pa decrease in yield using a Modified Duration approach. Comment on the accuracy of this calculation.

(5 marks)

Question 5

  • What is the difference between market segmentation theory and preferred habitat theory in explaining the yield curve?

(2 marks)

Question 6

  • A bond fund manager holds $1 million of Australian government bonds that mature in 5 years and wishes to hedge against interest rate movements. The 10 Year Treasury bond futures contract is currently trading at a price of 94.650. What strategy should the manager implement and at what price should the transaction be made?

(4 marks)

EFN415 Final Exam

Question 1

Assume the following information exists in

May 2010:AOI = 2600

Dec 2010 SPI Futures = 2660

Rf = 6% pa; Dividend Yield = 4% pa. Illustrate any arbitrage strategy that may be available, discussing the difficulties in implementing it.

(4 marks)

Question 2

  • Compare and contrast active and passive portfolio management.

(3 marks)

Question 3

  • Discuss what an option delta measures and how it may be used for hedging with call and put options.

(4 marks)

Question 4

  • A five-year zero-coupon bond with a face value of $100 is currently yielding 8% pa. Calculate its Duration and Modified Duration. Calculate its change in price for a 2% pa decrease in yield using a Modified Duration approach. Comment on the accuracy of this calculation.

(5 marks)

Question 5

  • What is the difference between market segmentation theory and preferred habitat theory in explaining the yield curve?

(2 marks)

Question 6

  • A bond fund manager holds $1 million of Australian government bonds that mature in 5 years and wishes to hedge against interest rate movements. The 10 Year Treasury bond futures contract is currently trading at a price of 94.650. What strategy should the manager implement and at what price should the transaction be made?

(4 marks)

Chem 110A Equations for Exams

Operators

 

ˆ                                         2 2

ˆ        2  2

 

1D:

 

3D:

p= –ix                  KE =- 2m  x2

pˆ = – iÑ

H =-

2m

 x2 + V (x)

 

 

 

3D volume element:

dV = dxdydz = r 2 sinJdrdJdj

 

Ñ2 = 1

r2   +  1       

sinJ   +      1      

2

 

r2 r

r   r2 sinJ ¶J

¶J    r2 sin2 J ¶j 2

 

Schrödinger equation:

Hˆ Y= EY , time-dependent: Hˆ Y(t) = i ¶ Y(t)

t

 

Uncertainty products: Da Db ³

éAˆ, Bˆù

where both operators are Hermitian.

 

ë       û

 

 

=     Y(t) éHˆ, Aˆù Y(t)   when operator Aˆ

itself does not depend on time

 

dt                            ë       û

 

 

Constants and Units

h

E = 27.211 eV = 4.3597 ´1018 J                                                      mass of electron

e

m = 9.109 ´10-31kg

 

h = 6.626 ´10-34 J s                                                                  = h / 2p = 1.055´10-34 J s

0

= 5.292 ´1011m = 0.5292 Å                                                         charge of electron e = -1.602 ´1019 C

 

atomic units:  = me

= a0

= e /

= 1,        atomic unit of time = 24.189 ´10-18s

 

            1             4pe2

e

fine structure constant: a =             =                                                         Bohr radius = a0  = 0                                                      

 

me c a0

137.036

m  e2

 

 

 

y (               æ npx ö

n2p 22

n2h2

 

Particle in a 1D box:

n x) =

2

sinè L

d2     k

ø                        En =

2

2mL2 = 8mL2

m m

 

Harmonic Oscillator:  H =-         +                                                             x

 

m =  1  2

 

 

 

æ a ö

1/ 4

y 0 ( x) = ç p ÷

ea x2 /2

2m dx 2    2

m1 + m2

 

è    ø      E = æ v + 1 ö w

 

3 1/ 4

v        ç      2 ÷

 

y ( x) = æ 4a ö

xea x2 /2                                                                              è                                                               ø

 

1                 ç p ÷

 

è        ø

1/ 4

with                w =

 

y ( x) = æ a ö

(2a x2  -1)ea x2 / 2

 

4p

2                  ç      ÷

è      ø

3 ( )    9p

æ a 3 ö1/ 4

y    x  = ç      ÷

è      ø

(2a x3

  • 3x)e

 

 

a x2 / 2

æ km ö1/ 2

a =

ç   2  ÷

è      ø

 

Hydrogen and other one-electron atoms

 

Z 2 æ

e2      ö        Z 2              Z 2

 

En =-   2 ç

÷ =-   2  Eh     in atomic units:  En  =-      2

 

 

2è a0 4pe0 ø      2n                        2n

 

æ

Angular momentum operators, Spherical Harmonics and Spin angular momentum

ˆ2             2         1             1     2 ö

 

L = -

ç sinJ ¶J sinJ ¶J + sin2 J ¶j 2 ÷

 

è ø

Lˆx  = ypˆz  zpˆ y Lˆy  = zpˆ x  xpˆz Lˆz  = xpˆ y  ypˆ x

 

 

 

ˆ                1 ˆ2

 

Sˆ2   a

= 3 2 a

4

Sˆz   a

= 1  a

2

 

H rigid rotor = 2I L

Sˆ2   b

= 3 2 b

4

Sˆz    b

=- 1  b

2

 

 

Hydrogenic Radial Functions, Rn,l (r)                                                              (Z = atomic number)

 

æ Z ö3/ 2

1 æ Z

ö3/ 2          –s

 

R1,0

(r ) = 2 ç     ÷

a

es

R2,1

(r ) =      ç       ÷

2a

o e 2

 

è   0 ø

æ  Z

ö3/ 2 æ

o ö –s

è

4 2 æ

0 ø

Z  ö3/ 2       æ

o ö  –s                            Zr

 

R2,0 (r ) = 2 ç       ÷    ç1-

÷ e 2

R3,1 (r ) =

ç       ÷    s ç1-

÷ e 3              s =

 

è 2 a0 ø    è      2 ø

9 è 3a0 ø

è      6 ø                     a0

 

æ Z ö3/ 2 æ

2s     2s 2 ö –s

2 2 æ Z

ö3/ 2            –s

 

R    (r ) = 2 ç       ÷    ç1-      +

÷ e 3

R    (r ) =          ç       ÷

o 2e 3

 

3,0

è 3a0 ø    è

3       27 ø

3,2

27 5 è 3a0 ø

 

 

 

sin2æ a ö = 1 cosa

Trigonometric identities

cos2æ a ö = 1+ cosa

 

ç   ÷                                          ç   ÷

è 2 ø          2                              è 2 ø                2

sin x sin y 1 cos(x – y) – 1 cos(x y)

2 2

cos x cos y = 1 cos(x y) + 1 cos(x + y)

2 2

sin x cos y = 1 sin(x y) + 1 sin(x + y)

 

 

e± ix

 

= cos x ± i sin x                sin x =

2

 

eix – eix

 

2i

2

 

cos x =

eix eix

 

2

 

Integrals

 

 

 

ò sin2(ax)dx = x  1 sin(2ax)

Indefinite Integrals

ò sin(ax)cos(ax) = 1 sin2(ax)

 

2     4a

x      1

2a

m               r        mxm – r

 

ò cos2(ax)dx =

+

2     4 a

sin(2ax)         ò xmeaxdx eax å(-1)

r = 0

(m r)!ar+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ò sin2

a

(Cxdx =

Definite integrals

 

2(b a)C + sin(2aC) – sin(2bC) 4C

 

L      æ np x ö     æ mp x ö

L       æ np x ö      æ mp x ö        L

 

ò sinç        ÷sinç        ÷dx = ò cosç                 ÷cosç

÷dx =

dn,m

 

0      è  L  ø     è L ø

0       è L ø

è L ø 2

 

L      æ np x ö        æ mp x ö          L2         2((-1)m+n -1) mnL2

 

ò sin ç

L ÷ x sin ç

L ÷ dx =

if m = n, or

4

(m2n2 )2p 2

if m ¹ n

 

0      è        ø        è         ø

L      æ np x ö          æ mp x ö

L3 æ         3    ö

4(-1)m+n mnL3

 

ò sin ç        ÷ x2 sin ç         ÷ dx =

ç 2 – 2 2 ÷ if m = n, or

2           2 2 2

if m ¹ n

 

0      è   L  ø          è   L ø

12 è      n p ø

(m n ) p

 

L      æ np x ö d       æ mp x ö

2mn

 

ò sinç        ÷     sinç         ÷dx = 2

 

if n m is odd, or 0 if n m is even

 

0      è   L  ø dx      è L ø

n m

 

 

 

Simple exponential integrals

 

¥

ò xneaxdx =

0

n! an+1

 

 

 

Some Gaussian integrals

 

 

 

ò x eax2  dx = 0

¥

ò xeax2  dx =  1

¥

ò eaxdx =

¥
2 a

x 2ne– ax 2 dx 1· 3· 5…(2n 1)

 

0                                    2a

¥

ò                      n n

ò                     n +1 n

¥

 

2an+1

ò x2 n+1 eax2 dx = n!

0

 

x 2ne– ax 2 dx 1· 3· 5…(2n 1)

0                                                      2    a

Resit Coursework — Systems Programming in C and ARM Assembler

Resit Coursework — Systems Programming in C and ARM Assembler

1     Overview

The aim of this coursework is to develop a simple, systems-level application in C and ARM assembler. The ARM code should run on the CPUlator. The C code can run on any Linux platform.

The learning objective of this coursework is for students to obtain understanding of the interaction beween embedded hardware and external devices, in order to control this interaction in low-level code. The programming skills will cover detailed resource management and time sensitive operations. Design choices regarding languages, tools, and libraries chosen for the implementation need to be justified in the accompanying report. This coursework will develop personal abilities in articulating system-level operations and identifying performance implications of given systems through the written report that should accompany the complete implementation.

The report needs to critically reflect on the software development process for (embedded) systems programming and contrast it to mainstream programming.

Screencasts with explanations of the CW spec are available in a short version  and in a long version                                                                  .

The gitlab repos for the coursework are here for the C code  and here for the ARM Assembler code                                                           .

2      Lab Environment

No physical or remote lab access is required for the CW. The programming can be done on a local machine for the C part, and on the online CPUlator for the Assembler part (see below). If needed, the departmental machine jove can be used via ssh or x2go, and has all necessary software installed to do the C programming, and it supports cross-compilation for ARM so that most of the Assembler programming can be done there as well (except for programming the HEX display).

The C coding for this coursework can be done on a local machine, or in the MACS VM, that has a C compiler, and the gcc compilation toolchain (including assembler and linker) installed. No external devices are programmed and no hardware specific aspects need to be considered for the C coding.

The ARM Assembler coding is best done on the web-based, online CPUlator. The hardware specific aspects of programming the HEX device, will only run on the CPUlator, or directly on hardware with the DE1-SOC by Altera.

Part 1: C Program: Cracking a Rotation Cipher

The goal of this part of the CW is to develop a program that can crack a simple rotation cipher. See the series of exercises and screencasts on developing a simple rotation cipher (rot13): Week 7 of the F28HS course and this gitlab repo with Version 0 of a sequence of exercises. The C code for the rotation cipher can be taken from these exercises.

Given: a cipher text (a text after application of a rotation cipher), and a dictionary of words, that covers all words in the plain text;

Find: the key for the rotation cipher that can be used to decrypt the plain text, and print the key (if found) together with the plain text.

Ciphertext: gur dhvpx oebja sbk whzc bire gur ynml qbt

Figure 1: Idea for the algorithm trying to find the decryption key

Assumptions: The following assumptions can be made on the input text. All words in the original plain text are lower case words and each word is contained in the given dictionary (in words.txt). The words are separated by exactly one space symbol and there are no punctuation symbols in the plain text. The space symbol is unmodified by the encryption/decryption (as can be seen from the given encryption function in the template code). Note that the given encryption function can be used for both encryption and decryptions: if the key for encrypting is N, then the key for decrypting is 26−N.

Idea: The main idea of the algorithm to crack the cipher is to do a brute force search through a dictionary for words, that, when encrypted, give the current word in cipher text. This needs to be checked for all possible rotation values of 1–26. This is feasible, since typically only a few words will be mapped to a cipher word for any of the possible keys. The correct key needs to map dictionary words to all of the words in the cipher text.

Figure 1 shows the main idea of the algorithm: An outer loop should iterate over all cipher words. In an inner loop try all possible keys (1–26) on the current cipher word and check whether the resulting word is in the dictionary. If this is the case, the key is a candidate for decrypting the entire cipher text. In this case, use the candidate key to try and decrypt the entire ciphertext. If every decrypted word in the cipher text is in the dictionary, then we can assume that the candidate key is valid decyption key, and we can terminate the search. Return the key and print it as the result.

Structure of the Algorithm: The template in the gitlab repo contains the basic code structure to be used in this brute force search. The filename for the dictionary (words.txt) can be hard-coded in the program. The main functions are:

• int crack_rot(char **dict, char **text)

this is the top level function for cracking the rotation cipher; it takes the dictionary as an array of strings (i.e. pointer to characters) and the cipher text, split into words, also represented as an array of strings.

• int try_key(char **dict, char **text, int key)

this function takes the dictionary, as an array of words, the cipher text, also as an array of words, and the candidate key as input, and tries do decipher each work int text with the key; if each deciphered word is in the dictionary, we have found the key and return it as the result; otherwise a value of −1 should be returned.

• char** read_dictionary(char *fname)

this function takes the filename of the dictionary as input, reads all words from the file (one word per line), and returns an array of words, containing all the words from the dictionay, as a result

• void rotN(char *str, int n)

this is an implementation of the rotation cipher, and encripts the string str with the key n; it performs the encryption in-place, i.e. the result of the execution is a modified string str containing the ciphertext of the input.

• char** str_to_arr_words (char *str)

this is an auxiliary function that takes a string as an input, which is either a plain text or cipher text string, breaks it into words and returns an array of these words as a result; the words in the input string are separated by exactly one space, use only lower case letter, and there are no punctuation symbols in the text.

• void show_arr_words (char **arr_words)

this is an auxiliary function that prints all words in the given array of words; it’s not needed for the main functionality of the code, but very useful for testing.

Support files: For an example how to read all lines from a file, using the POSIX function getline, see the getlineexample.c. Use this function in your code to read all words from the dictionary words.txt, and store the words in an array of strings in the code. The program should be able to process several ciphertexts in one execution, taking a file with one ciphertext per line as input. The file filein.txt is a sample file of such ciphertexts. The script test.sh tests the execution of the program with the filein.txt input file. This script can be run from the command line, without arguments. It is also automatically executed when uploading a new version of the code into the gitlab repo.

Interface:        The program should run from the command-line and use the following options:

./crack_rot [-h] [-v] [-d] [-f <filename>] [<key> <plaintext>]

The -h options should print a short help message and terminate. The -v option should enable verbose output, about files read and keys tested. The -d option should enable debugging output, with more detailed output that can be used for debugging. The -f options should provide the file filename as an input file (see below).

If no arguments are provided, the program should use a hard-coded ciphertext in the main function, and try to crack the cipher (see existing template code for an example). If a key and plaintext argument are provided, then the program should encrypt the plaintext with the key and print the ciphertext. This is useful for generating test cases, but is not used in the main functionality of the algorithm. If the option -f is provided with a filename, then this filename should contain a list of ciphertexts, one on each line, and each cipher text should be cracked in turn by the main algorithm above. For each ciphertexts the key and the decrypted text should be printed. Below is the expected output, using the filein.txt sample file from the repository. Use exactly this output format: the test.sh script uses this format to check the results automatically, when uploading in the gitlab repo and you can check the CI-pipeline to see whether your implementation produces the expected result.

# ./crack_rot -f filein.txt

Key: 13

Testing

Cipher text: ’gur jbeq vf guvf’ Cracked text: ’the word is this’ with cracked key: 13

Key: 13

Testing

Cipher text: ’gur dhvpx oebja sbk whzc bire gur ynml qbt’ Cracked text: ’the quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog’ with cracked key: 13

Key: 13

Testing

Cipher text: ’gur yvggyr gbja snqr njnl vagb pbhagel ba bar fvqr pybfr gb gur ragenaprjnl Cracked text: ’the little town fade away into country on one side close to the entranceway with cracked key: 13

Key: 7

Testing

Cipher text: ’aol xbpjr iyvdu mve qbtw vcly aol shgf kvn’ Cracked text: ’the quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog’ with cracked key: 7

Key: 20

Testing

Cipher text: ’yllihyiom wixy cm nby miolwy iz uff ypcf’ Cracked text: ’erroneous code is the source of all evil’ with cracked key: 20

Key: 17

Testing

Cipher text: ’sv sfcu reu xf nyviv efsfup yrj xfev svwfiv’ Cracked text: ’be bold and go where nobody has gone before’ with cracked key: 17

Testing: Test Part 1 by running the above command from the command-line and put a screenshot of the result in your report. The expected output is also available in the repository file fileout.txt. Also, generate your own input file (using key and plaintext arguments in the command line above) and test your program with a 5-line input file. Use the script test.sh from the command line for automatic testing:

# sh ./test.sh

and check that it ends with a line like

2 of 2 tests are OK

Part 2: ARM Assembler Program: 2 Button counters

Implement counters for the two right-most buttons on the CPUlator in ARM Assembler and display the counters on the 2 rightmost HEX displays. The ARM Assembler code should probe for button presses of the two right-most buttons, labelled 0 and 1 on the CPUlator, keep counters for the number of button presses detected and display the two counters, each as a two digit number, on the HEX displays of the CPUlator. Continuously pressing one button should increment the counter, i.e. it’s not necessary to check for distinct button presses. The gitlab project with a template for the ARM Assembler code is here. .

The starting point for the code is the sample source code for counting button presses from the course. This code also has a delay function which should be used in the main counting loop. This code needs to be extended to check for two buttons, and keep counters separate. These counters need to be kept in main

Figure 2: Example of running the ARM Assembler program for counting button presses

memory, and not just in a register. For displaying the numbers on the HEX displays, the divrem sample source code from the course is useful: it allows to split an integer value into its digits.

The gitlab repo for this ARM Assembler part of the coursework contains a template file with a suggested structure, and with the delay function. It is recommended that you implement these subroutines:

  • divrem

this is an auxiliary function, computing divisor and remainder for the values in registers R0 and R1

• show_counters

this function should iterate over the counters for the button presses, and display each counter using the functions below;

• show_counter

this function should take the number of the button in register R0 as input and display its counter using the function below;

• show2digits

this function should take the two digits of the counter in registers R0 and R1 and display the values on two HEX displays

Figure 2 shows an example of running the program, highlighting the buttons to press and the HEX display to use for displaying the counters.

Testing: Test Part 2 by running it on the CPUlator and include a screenshot of the running application in your report.

3     Submission

You must submit the complete project files, containing the source code (separate files for the C and for the ARM Assembler code), a stand-alone executable of the C program, and the report (in .pdf format) as one .zip file no later than 3:30 PM on Thursday 5th August 2021. You should also submit the C code and ARM Assembler code in separate files by pushing to a forked version for each of the 2 gitlab repositories (one for the C and one for the ARM Assembler part of the CW). Submission must be through Vision (find the “Resit Assessment” item in the top-level ”Assessment” section), submitting all of the above files in one .zip file. This resit coursework is worth 100% of the course’s mark.

You are marked for the functionality of the application, but also for code quality and the discussion in the short report. The marking scheme for this project is attached. This project should be done individually.

4     Report Format

The report should have 1 – 4 pages and needs to cover the following:

  • A short discussion of the code structure, specifying the functionality of the main functions (for each of the C and Assembler part)
  • A discussion of the behaviour of the main functions in the C and Assembler programs, realising the specified behaviour.
  • A sample execution of the program in debug mode (see Testing discussion above)
  • A summary, covering what was achieved (and what not), outstanding features, and what you have learnt from this coursework

Marking Scheme

Criteria Marks
Meeting system requirements and functionality (as specified in Part 1 and 2 of this document) 60
Report Quality

Contents matching the structure in Section 4; discussion of program logic (C) and of the core Assembler functions; summary of learning outcomes achieved.

10
Code Quality

Code quality (both C and ARM Assembler), clear function interfaces, sufficient comments.

30
Total marks 100

Professional Conduct and Plagiarism

This is a individual project, and you will have to submit your own, original solution for this coursework specification, consisting of a report, the source code and an executable. Where external resources have been used, these need to be clearly identified and referenced.

A check on source code plagiarism will be performed on all submissions. Confirmed plagiarism will result in disciplinary procedures depending on the scale of misconduct.

Plagiarism:

This project is assessed as an individual project. You must work on your own and not share work with other students on this course. You can discuss general technical issues related to this work with other students, however, you must not share concrete pieces of code or text. Readings, web sources and any other material that you use from sources other than lecture material must be appropriately acknowledged and referenced. Plagiarism in any part of your report will result in referral to the disciplinary committee, which may lead to you losing all marks for this coursework and may have further implications on your degree. For details see this link

Late Submission Policy

The standard penalty of -30% of the maximum available mark applies to late submissions. No submissions will be accepted after 5 working days beyond the submission deadline.

Chemistry exam

Instructions: You may use a pencil or pen. You will not need your calculator. No other materials are allowed. Write all answers on the exam in the spaces provided, or clearly continued on the backs of the pages and labeled unambiguously. When you are asked to explain something, do so in complete English sentences, with equations where appropriate.

There are three pages of equations distributed with the exam. Be sure to look at them before you begin the exam, since you may be able to make use of them to shorten the work of some of the problems.

 

Problem Score
1 / 10
2. / 15
3. / 20
4. / 14
5. / 06
6. / 15
7. / 20
8. / 08
Total /108

 

1.    (10 points) Commutators of quantum mechanical operators

The x component of the angular momentum operator can be written in terms of the

 

position and momentum operators as

Lˆx  = y pˆz  z pˆy .

 

 

Evaluate the commutator

éëLˆx , Lˆz ùû

You can use the basic commutators:

[x, pˆx ] = i, (same for y and z) and [y, pˆx ] = 0 (and

 

the obvious similar commutators that equal zero).

 

 

  1. (15 points, first order perturbation theory) The motion of a particle of mass    is described by the Hamiltonian

 

 

+
2
2

Hˆ    =-    d      k x2

 

H (1)

(x)

 

2

2m dx     2

 

 

 

where

H (x) = ì cx    x ³ 0

 

î

1                í-cx   x < 0          x

 

(dashed line in figure)

 

Treating H (1)(x)as a perturbation, calculate the ground state energy of this system.

 

Express your answer in terms of the harmonic oscillator quantities

æ km ö1/2

 

2

w =                a = ç     ÷

è  ø

and the coefficient c.

 

 

Hinst: (1) Formulas for the harmonic oscillator and some useful integrals are given on the equation sheets distributed with this exam. The integral you need is among the “Gaussian integrals.” (2) Remember to add the unperturbed energy to the perturbation correction to get the complete approximation to the ground state energy.

 

workspace for problem 2

 

  1. (20 points, Linear variational method, Stark effect) The Hamiltonian for the rigid rotor molecule with a dipole moment in an electric field of strength                                                   is

The angle q is the angle the rotor makes with the field, which is pointing along the z axis.

In presence of an electric field, two spherical harmonics, Y1,1 ( J = 1, m = 1 ) and Y2,1

( J = 2, m = 1) will be mixed to produce two new energy eigenstates.

Use the variational trial functionf c1Y11 (q ,j ) + c2Y21 (q ,j ) to estimate the energy of the two states.

 

 

 

 

 

The following integrals will be useful.

2p p

ò òY1,1 (q ,j ) cosq Y1,1 (q ,j )sinq dq dj = 0

0  0

2p p

ò òY2,1 (q ,j ) cosq Y2,1 (q ,j )sinq dq dj = 0

0  0

2p p

ò òY1,1 (q ,j ) cosq Y2,1 (q ,j )sinq dq dj =

0 0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

workspace for problem 3

 

 

 

4.    (14 points: Atomic Orbitals of Hydrogenic Species)

Consider Li2+ ion, which is a hydrogenic (hydrogen-like) species.

  • (10 pts) Calculate the average distance of the electron from the nucleus if the electron is in the 1s orbital. Express your answer in terms of the Bohr radius (a0).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • (4 pts) Express the distance where the radial node of the 2s orbital occurs, in terms of a0.

 

  1. (6 points, Slater Determinant) Consider the excited state wave function for He atom given by the following Slater

 

F   (1, 2) = 1

y 2,1,1a (1)

y 3,2,-2a (1)

 

He                           2 y 2,1,1a (2) y 3,2,-2a (2)

Here y 2,1,1 and y 3,2,2 are hydrogenic wave functions (with 𝑍 = 2, see the equation sheet).

 

Show that FHe (1, 2) is an eigenfunction of

Lˆz  = Lˆz ,1  + Lˆz ,2 . What is the eigenvalue?

 

Lˆz ,1,  Lˆz ,2 ,  and Lˆz

are the z-components of the orbital angular momentum operators for

 

electrons 1 and 2, and the z-component of the total orbital angular momentum operator, respectively.

 

6.    (15 points) Atomic Term symbols

What atomic term symbols arise from the excited state configuration 1s13d1 for the lithium atom? Include the J quantum number subscripts in your list of all the term symbols.

Identify the lowest energy state and its degeneracy.

 

Microstate Table

 

   M S
1 0 -1
 

 

 M L

2  (2+ , 0+ )  (2+ , 0 ),(2 , 0+ )  (2 , 0 )
1  (1+ , 0+ )  (1+ , 0 ), (1 , 0+ )  (1 , 0 )
0  (0+ , 0+ )  (0+ , 0 ),(0 , 0+ )  (0 , 0 )
-1  (-1+ , 0+ )  (-1+ , 0 ),(-1 , 0+ )  (-1 , 0 )
-2  (-2+ , 0+ )  (-2+ , 0 ),(-2 , 0+ )  (-2, 0 )

 

  1. (20 points) Molecular Orbitals of H2+

Consider an H2+ ion. In the figure below, HA, HB, and e represent the two nuclei and the electron, respectively, and all the relevant distances are defined. You must use atomic units for this problem.

 

  • (3 points) Write down the Schrödinger equation for the electrons and nuclei in the H2+ ion, specifying all the terms in the

Hamiltonian.

 

 

 

  • (3 points) Write down the Born-Oppenheimer Hamiltonian for the electrons only, with the internuclear distance fixed, for the H2+ Explain the physical basis ofthe Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

The nuclei are much heavier than an electron, therefore the motion of nuclei is

much slower.

 

 

  • (4 points) The lowest energy molecular orbital is expressed in terms of the linear combination of two 1s atomic orbitals centered on the two nuclear positions as:

y +  = N+ (y1sA +y1sB )

Determine the normalization constant N+ . Show the work and express the answer in terms of S .

 

S y1sA y1sB

= òall space dry1sA (r)y1sB (r)

 

 

 

(Problem continues in the next page)

 

  • (10 points) Find an expression for the total energy of the ground state H2+ in termsof S and the following integrals. Show the work. Explain what each term in your result

 

1sA

 

1s

1sA

 

1s

= òall space

=

dry

 

dry

 

1sA

(r) 1 y

rB

r
  • 1 y

 

 

1sA

(r)

 

(r)

 

A                   B                      òall space

1sA

1sB

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 (8 points) Molecular Orbitals

Consider the ground state electron configuration of the N2- diatomic ion.

 

(1s

)2 (1s

)2 (2s

)2 (2s

)2 (3s

)2 (1p

)4 (1p  )1

 

g                 u                   g                   u                  g                 u                   g

  • (3 points) List all the occupied bonding

 

 

1s g , 2s g , 3s g ,1pu

 

 

 

 

 

  • (2 points) Calculate the bond order of N2-.

 

 

 

  • (3 points) Sketch the shape of 1p g

only one.

orbital. If multiple orbitals are degenerate, draw

 

Some Possibly Useful Equations

   +
2
2
2

Operators

 

1D:

pˆx  = –i

KE =-   

Hˆ =- 

2

2       V (x)

 

x

3D:

2m x

 

2m x

 

 

3D volume element:

 

 

Uncertainty products: Da Db ³

éAˆ, Bˆù

where both operators are Hermitian.

 

ë       û

 

 

=     Y(t) éHˆ, Aˆù Y(t)   when operator Aˆ

itself does not depend on time

 

dt                            ë       û

 

Constants and Units

 

h

E = 27.211 eV = 4.3597 ´1018 J                                                    mass of electron = 9.109 ´1031kg

0

h = 6.626 ´ 1034 J sec                                                                a = 5.29177 ´1011m = 0.529177 Å

charge of electron e = -1.602 ´1019 C, or in Gaussian units e = -4.803´1010 esu

 

atomic units:  = me

= a0

= e /

= 1, atomic unit of time = 24.189 ´1018 s

 

fine structure constant: a =     

me c a0

=      1

137.036

 

4pe2                         2

Bohr radius = a0  = 0     or in Gaussian units a0 =

e
e

m e2                           m e2

 

 

y (               æ npx ö

n2p 22

n2h2

 

Particle in a 1D box:

n x) =

2

sinè  L

d2     k

ø                        En =

2

2mL2 = 8mL2

m m

 

Harmonic Oscillator:  H =-         +                                                             x

 

m =  1  2

 

 

( x) = p
y

æ a ö1/ 4

0                  ç    ÷

è    ø

ea x2 /2

2m dx 2     2

m1

æ      1 ö

  • m2

 

3

y ( x) = æ 4a

ö1/ 4

xea x2 /2

E = çn +

n

è

÷w

2 ø

 

1                  ç p ÷

 

è        ø

1/ 4

with                w =

 

y ( x) = æ a ö

(2a x2  -1)ea x2 / 2

 

2                  ç 4p ÷

æ km ö1/2

 

è      ø        a = ç        ÷

 

3 1/ 4

è 2 ø

 

ç 9p ÷
3

y ( x) = æ a  ö

è      ø

(2a x3  – 3x)ea x2 / 2

 

Hydrogen and other one-electron atoms

Z 2 æ    e2   ö        Z 2

 

En =-   2 ç

÷ =-

2 Eh

 

2è a0 4pe0 ø      2n

 

Angular momentum operators, Spherical Harmonics and Spin angular momentum

 

 

è        ø

Y    = æ 5

 

 

ö1/ 2

(3cos2 J -1)

 

2,0

 

 

Y2,±1

ç 16p ÷

æ 15 ö1/ 2

8p

=  ç     ÷

è      ø

sinJcosJe±ij

Lˆx

Lˆy

Lˆ

= ypˆz

= zpˆ x

= xpˆ

  • zpˆy
  • xpˆz
  • ypˆ

 

8p

Y     =  æ

 

3 ö1/ 2

 

sin2 J e±2ij

z               y               x

 

2,±2             ç      ÷

è      ø

 

1

Hˆ rigid rotor  =

2I

Lˆ2

Sˆ 2a = (3/ 4) 2a

Sˆ 2b = (3/ 4) 2b

Sˆza = (1/2) a

Sˆzb = -(1/2) b

 

 

Hydrogenic Radial Functions, Rn,l (r)                                                              (Z = atomic number)

 

æ Z ö 3/ 2

  • Zr

 

1 æ Z

ö 3/ 2 Zr

  • Z r

 

 

(r) = 2 ç    ÷

e a0

R  (r) =       ç       ÷

e 2 a0

 

1,0

è a0 ø

2,1

3 è 2 a0 ø      a0

 

æ Z ö 3/ 2 æ

Zr ö – Zr

 

4 2 æ Z ö 3/ 2 Zr æ

Zr ö – Z r

 

 

R   (r) = 2ç      ÷     ç1-

÷ e 2a0

R  (r) =         ç       ÷

ç1-

÷ e 3 a0

 

2,0

è 2 a0 ø    è

2 a0 ø

3,1

9   è 3a0 ø

a0 è

6 a0 ø

 

æ  ö 3/ 2 æ      2Zr

2Z 2 r2 ö – Zr

 

2 2 æ Z ö 3/ 2 æ Z rö 2

  • Z r

 

 

R   (r) = 2ç      ÷     ç1-        +

÷ e 3a0

R (r) =

ç       ÷     ç

÷ e 3 a0

 

0

3,0

è 3 a0 ø    è

3a0

27 a2 ø

3,2

27 5 è 3a0 ø

è a0 ø

 

 

 

sin2æ a ö = 1 cosa

Trigonometric identities

cos2æa ö = 1+ cosa

 

ç   ÷                                      ç   ÷

è 2 ø         2                           è 2 ø               2

sin x sin y 1 cos(x – y) – 1 cos(x y)

2 2

cos x cos y = 1 cos(x y) + 1 cos(x + y)

2 2

sin x cos y 1 sin(x – y) + 1 sin(x y)

 

 

 

e± ix

 

= cos x ± i sin x                sin x =

2

 

eix – eix

 

2i

2

 

cos x =

eix eix

 

2

 

Integrals

 

 

 

ò sin2(ax)dx = x  1 sin(2ax)

Indefinite Integrals

ò sin(ax) cos(ax)dx = 1 sin2(ax)

 

2    4a

ò

x     1

2a

ò              å

m               r        mxm – r

 

cos2(ax)dx =    +

2

sin(2ax)          xmeaxdx eax    (-1)

4 a                                           r = 0

(m r)!ar+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ò sin2

a

 

(Cxdx =

Definite integrals

 

2(b a)C + sin(2aC) – sin(2bC) 4C

 

L      æ np x ö     æ mp x ö

L       æ np x ö      æ mp x ö        L

 

ò sinç        ÷sinç        ÷dx = ò cosç                 ÷cosç

÷dx =

dn,m

 

0      è  L  ø     è L ø

0       è L ø

è L ø 2

 

L      æ np x ö        æ mp x ö          L2        2((-1)m+n -1) mnL2

 

ò sin ç

L ÷ x sin ç

L ÷ dx =

if m = n, or

4

(m2n2 )2p 2

if m ¹ n

 

0      è        ø        è         ø

L      æ np x ö          æ mp x ö

L3 æ         3    ö

4(-1)m+n mnL3

 

ò sin ç        ÷ x2 sin ç         ÷ dx =

ç 2 – 2 2 ÷ if m = n, or

 

2           2 2 2

if m ¹ n

 

0      è   L  ø          è   L ø

12 è       n p ø

(m n ) p

 

L      æ np x ö d       æ mp x ö

2mn

 

ò sinç        ÷     sinç         ÷dx = 2

 

if n m is odd, or 0 if n m is even

 

0      è   L  ø dx      è L ø

n m

 

 

 

simple exponential integrals

 

¥

ò xneaxdx =

0

n! an+1

 

 

 

Some Gaussian integrals

 

 

¥

ò xeaxdx = 0

¥

xeaxdx =  1

¥

ò eaxdx =

¥
2 a

x 2ne– ax 2 dx 1· 3· 5…(2n 1)

 

0

ò            2a

¥

ò                      n n

ò                     n +1 n

¥

 

ò                  n +1

x 2n +1eax 2 dx = n!

0                                            2a

 

x 2ne– ax 2 dx 1· 3· 5…(2n 1)

0                                                      2    a

mistry exam

ELE00124M Research Methods Data Analysis Assignment

ELE00124M Research Methods Data Analysis Assignment (100%) –
Hand in electronically via the VLE using departmental standard process

This assignment assesses your understanding of quantitative data analysis and your ability to report your findings accurately and succinctly.
• You are required to report on the findings of your statistical analyses in a style that follows the standard IEEE report template (downloadable from the IEEE website).
• You will be provided with a complex data set, generated by students here at the University of York, for the purpose of the analysis.
• The report will contain your analysis of the supplied data which was produced by using a marking rubric or score sheet (attached as an appendix for your information).
• The .csv data file can be opened in MS Excel and basic statistical analyses performed. If you are familiar with SPSS then you may also use that software to perform your analyses.
• The depth and breadth of analyses you make will ultimately be up to you but your mark will depend on the evidence you provide to indicate your understanding of quantitative research and statistical analysis techniques.

Guidance on Analyzing the data file based on the appended Presentation Assessment Rubric.
1) The available marks will be allocated based on the depth and breadth of your quantitative statistical analysis and your discussion of the results.
2) You should consider, report and discuss comparisons across as many relevant data sets as you feel are appropriate – it is suggested that you formulate an analysis plan. Some of the most obvious data analysis objects are suggested below, others might emerge:
a. The actual mark given by academic assessors could be compared with the average marks from other assessors
b. Performance of assessors of different gender
c. Performance of presenters of different gender
d. Any other appropriate statistical outputs

Additional information:
• The report should be a maximum of 3000 words.
• Credit will be given for the appropriate use of references in IEEE format.
• Maximum of 4 pages of appendices.
• Tables are included in the total word count.
• Cover page, contents list, figures, appendices and references are excluded from the total word count.

ELE00124M Research Methods Data Analysis 2020-21

Individual Report (100%) – Marking and Feedback Sheet

Student name/identifier: Marker: Mark:

1.Report layout in IEEE format, readability, references (10 marks) Mark:
Comments:

2. Data cleansing and reasoning behind it (20 marks) Mark:
Comments:

3. Design of analysis and selected statistical tests (20 marks) Mark:
Comments:

4. Depth of statistical analysis (20 marks) Mark:
Comments:

5. Commentary, synthesis and discussion of results (30 marks) Mark:
Comments: