Comparative International Human Resource Management

 

 

Comparative International Human Resource Management (6HR507)

 

Module Handbook                                   

Academic Year 2020 – 2021

 

 

 

Table of Contents

MODULE CONTEXT. 3

MODULE LEARNING OUTCOMES. 3

INDICATIVE MODULE CONTENT. 4

MODULE LEARNING & TEACHING METHODS. 4

MODULE ASSESSMENT. 6

ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK. 7

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION DATE. 8

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA. 8

WRITTEN ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES. 9

ANONYMOUS MARKING.. 9

REGULATIONS. 10

HARVARD REFERENCING.. 10

PLAGIARISM & COLLUSION. 10

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 11

SCHEME OF WORK. 12

TUTOR ACCESS. 12

LEVEL 6 (YEAR 3 UG) MARKING DESCRIPTORS.. 13

SCHEME OF WORK.. 17

MODULE RESOURCES. 22

RECOMMENDED TEXTS. 22

OTHER USEFUL TEXTS. 22

SELECTED JOURNAL ARTICLES. 25

KEY CONTACTS. 27

 

 

 

WELCOME TO COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL HRM

MODULE CONTEXT

As companies need to become more established in the international environment, the challenge to create, establish, maintain and develop effective policy and practice in managing a more culturally diverse workforce is seen as a pivotal component of business success.  The module explores, examines and compares different approaches to HR and how these opportunities available to organisations can facilitate entry or help confirm their position in the global market.

 

MODULE LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate approaches to managing the human resource on an international basis
  2. Examine the rationale for standardised versus a culturally diverse approach to HRM
  3. Compare and analyse differing employment policy, process and practice when managing HR across international boundaries

 

INDICATIVE MODULE CONTENT

You will examine perspectives on contemporary practice in managing human resources in international / global business.  You will evaluate why strategic choices can and do influence subsequent decisions in the way people are hired, managed, developed and possibly fired as a business seeks to establish its international presence. National cultures and their relevance in the study of business and organisations impact on the way people are engaged in the workplace which will require you to research and compare the classic western versus non-western approaches.

 

Typically the module will explore and examine the relations between host countries and parent companies, the purpose and role of an expatriate workforce as a means of quickly establishing an international presence, the impact and value of culture and the transference and potential utilisation of different approaches and appreciation of high performance in those different contexts.

 

MODULE LEARNING & TEACHING METHODS

Typically the model of delivery will be as set out below, but may be subject to some degree of flexible change according to your engagement and input

 

Activity type                                                         Hours                       Category

Lectures:       (12 x 2 hours)                                    24 hours                             1

Seminars / Workshops:      (12 x 2 hours              24 hours                             1

Guided independent study:                                 152 hours                           2

Total:                                                                     200 hours

 

Total Learning Hours in each category:

Category 1: 24 + 24 = 48 (24%)

Category 2: 152 hours (76%)

 

 

 

Rationale for the choice of learning and teaching activities: The use of lectures will enable the utilisation of a range of teaching styles including lecture delivery, the use of audio-visual resources, and large group class discussion thus enabling an in depth critical learning experience. The use of seminars-workshops will enable the discussion of case study learning materials principally through student presentation of ideas and solutions to case study problems.  The use of these sessions will be facilitated through aspects of employer engagement on business world issues.  The seminar-workshops will usually take the form of block activities.

 

Formative activities will be incorporated into these seminar-workshops to facilitate individual learning and preparation for assessment.  Using a range of activities and specific topics covered by guest speakers, you will be encouraged to develop your critical evaluation skills to enable a robust approach to investigate and examine organisational approaches to talent management and development.

 

 

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Mode:                      Coursework 100%

The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

 

Coursework            100%

Formative Assessment: Poster Presentation in Week 5

Learning Outcomes to be assessed: 1 and 2

Throughout the module you will work on specific aspects of international HRM and, in groups, will create a poster based on a chosen case study organization and their approaches to IHRM and the implications of this.  The poster will be presented to the rest of the group for discussion and analysis in Week 5 in relation to the topics covered in the first four weeks of the module.

 

Final Summative Assessment: Individual written REPORT (3000 words)

Learning Outcomes to be assessed: 1-3

 

You are a HR Consultant working for a MNC from a country of your choice (country A) which is looking to engage in a Joint Venture with a company from a second country of your choice (country B). You have been asked to provide a critical overview of the main challenges (you must select THREE) that the MNC may confront in the creation of International Teams.  You should aim to address the following questions:

 

  • What are the major institutional and cultural differences which separate country A and country B? Use relevant models and theory to support your discussion and analysis.

 

  • What are the challenges and barriers of working in a multicultural managerial team comprising the companies’ representatives from both countries’ (A and B) firms?

 

  • What are the mechanisms for developing staff throughout international teams’ assignments and what is the role of expatriate’s cross-cultural training in supporting adjustment, enhancing horizontal communication, information flows and assignment performance?

 

To answer these questions, you will be expected to:

 

  1. a) Develop an analysis about the major political, economic, social factors with special emphasis on the institutional and cultural differences between the MNC (country A) and the company (country B). This analysis will be based on a critical evaluation of the relevant literature about the theoretical debate on International HRM.

 

  1. b) Discuss the role of corporate and national cultures of both countries (A and B) on the transfer and/or creation of a new organisational culture of the international Joint Venture.

 

  1. c) Identify and discuss the issues relating to the cross-cultural training, development, and performance of the International teams.

 

  1. d) Draw conclusions and suggest recommendations regarding a critical approach to IHRM in relation to cross cultural training, development and performance of international teams.

 

 

Additional information will be provided, both in the classroom and via the UDo module materials, throughout the module to advise you on the construct, process, expectations etc. within the assessments.   The submission due date is confirmed on page 8 of this module handbook.

 

Assessment criteria and guidelines are outlined on pages 8 & 9 of this module handbook for your reference and use in constructing your assignment.  Additional information will also be provided during the module to help you think about and construct your ideas for the assignments.

 

N.B.             

(1)       Submission of this report will be made electronically via Turnitin.

(2)      Submission of your work without due reason after the stated deadline will be considered as a late submission and will be graded according to Section F6 of the Rights, Responsibilities and Regulations (3R’s) document covering late submission of work. Point F6.1 notes that any work submitted after the designated deadline for the module assessment is deemed late, which consequently means the work will not be marked and NS (non-submission) will be recorded against your profile.  The information relating to the regulations can be found following this link: http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/organisation/academic-regulations/

(3)      All submissions will be screened using the Turnitin software to identify any potential academic offence relating to plagiarism and / or collusion

 

ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK

This is provided throughout the module on the work that you do in tutorials / workshops.  With regards to all assessments that form part of your module grade, feedback and provisional grades will be provided electronically.

 

As determined by Section F3.5 of the 3R’s document, students are entitled to feedback on assignments (for further information follow the link: http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/organisation/academic-regulations/

It is intended that grading and feedback on student assignments will take place as soon as possible, and every effort will be made to complete marking and provide feedback within 21 days (3 weeks) of the assignment submission date, except where work submission may fall in or around a holiday period (e.g. Christmas).  If there any delays in this process, you will be notified as such via UDo with an indication of a revised date for release of grades and feedback.  Students should also note that grades are at this stage provisional only, as student assessments are subject to internal and external moderation and only when they have been validated by the University Examination and Assessment Board will they become confirmed results.

 

 

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION DATES

Coursework: Friday 18th December 2020 at 11:59pm hours (UK time)

(work will be returned no later than 18th January 2021 unless previously communicated to the contrary).

 

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

In completing the assessments, you need to demonstrate all of the following skills:

  • Application of academic concepts
  • Critical awareness and analysis
  • Synthesis and presentation of key ideas
  • Evaluation of complex matters
  • Integration of ideas and practice in a cross disciplinary manner
  • Presentation (Written) of key concepts / ideas

 

 

WRITTEN ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES

  • Assignment must be submitted in required format, showing appropriate use of academic references and subheadings.
  • Word count must be shown on the assignment header page and must be within the word allowance tolerances shown within the assessment information.
  • Report style assignment must include a contents page.
  • Assignment must be typed in Arial, Microsoft Sans Serif or Verdana font style, and minimum font size 12.
  • Assignment must be line and half spacing with 2.5cm margins.

ANONYMOUS MARKING

The University of Derby is committed to ensuring a fair and equitable process in marking and grading student assessments.  To that end, all assessed work for this module will be submitted anonymously.

 

The policy guidance indicates that ‘Anonymity’ is the use of an identifier, which cannot be related to the student’s name without reference to central student records or other mechanism, in the assessment process. As a consequence, all summative assessment where practicable should be marked via student number and not according to student name

 

Point 7 of the Anonymous Marking Policy states that “it is the responsibility of students to respect and enable anonymity in the assessment process where anonymous marking applies, and to actively engage in the preservation of the anonymity mechanisms provided to them”.  To that end, a submission template for all assessed work has been provided as a guide for students to follow (please see page 17 of the ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE HANDBOOK).  Please note that it does not require you to submit your assignment with your name on that work.

N.B. A copy of the policy is available to view on UDo under MODULE INFO

 

REGULATIONS

The module conforms fully to the relevant to the University of Derby Undergraduate regulatory framework.

 

HARVARD REFERENCING

This is absolutely vital. You must apply this system of referencing to how you reference in the text and how you present your references in the reference section.  If you do not know how to do this then you can ask in the Library for their information hand out or you can visit a variety of online sites.  If your work is not properly referenced you are very unlikely to pass the assessment. You also need to make sure that you do not plagiarise as this will result in a fail or worse an inability to pass this year.  If you are unsure what constitutes plagiarism please check your induction material or visit the Library.  Your attention to the following book to help you in this endeavour:

 

Pears R & Shields G (2016) Cite Them Right: The Essential Referencing Guide (10th edition). Basingstoke, Hants: Palgrave Macmillan

 

Additional Hint:        have a look at top quality journal articles!

If you are in any doubt, please ask for help

PLAGIARISM & COLLUSION

You are reminded that plagiarism and collusion are considered serious offences and contravene University of Derby regulations.  If you are work is found to be plagiarised, or it has been found that you have colluded this is likely to result in failing the minimum standards and learning outcomes within the module and could be taken further.  If you are unsure of the University regulations it is your responsibility to familiarise yourself with them.  The regulations can be found in Section J of the University of Derby Academic Regulations (3R’s) at http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/organisation/academic-regulations/

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

You should attend all of the lectures and tutorials.  Attendance will be monitored and where appropriate you may be asked to explain your non-attendance.  Any failure to attend lectures and participate in the tutorial exercises may be considered non-engagement and as such lead to de-registration on the module.  It is expected that you will attend every seminar / workshop as this will directly facilitate the development and construction of your ideas for the assignments.  Your participation in each module is addressed in Section E of the University of Derby Academic Regulations (specifically Section E1.2) which can be found at http://www.derby.ac.uk/about/organisation/academic-regulations/

 

Please recognise that this is not just about turning up, your participation in the exercises and communicate with your peers and lecturer is essential to both the success of the module and to your learning.  Students who attend and engage always perform better and get more out of the class than those who do not.  If you have any questions about any aspect of the module please ask; you can speak to the module leader during the timetabled sessions, but will also take the opportunity to ask for a separate appointment should you need one.

 

Do not leave your work until the last minute – work on it each week and seek help when you need it.  Always work towards meeting assessment deadlines.  The deadlines are put in place to ensure that your workload is evenly spread; by extending and / or not engaging in the learning you are putting more pressure on yourself.  Poor time management is not a sufficient reason for non-submission of your work.

 

The module team is here to help but it is also your responsibility to accept your role and expectations in meeting a successful outcome for yourself.  Let us work together to achieve an outcome that meets your expectations.

 

 

 

SCHEME OF WORK

This handbook contains an outline of the topics / subjects that will be covered on a week by week basis (see page 16).  Please note that it is an indicative scheme only and may be subject to some alteration dependent on how your learning develops and where the various topics and exercises take us.

 

You will be given materials on the Blackboard site and should regularly check to see if more have been uploaded. You may be required to carry out work before you attend a lecture or tutorial; failure to do this work will result in you not being able to participate in the session fully, and may affect the learning outcomes. It is also very unfair on your peers, as group work means just that!

 

TUTOR ACCESS

You will have access to your tutors via email.  Enquiries made by students are normally responded to within two working days unless you have been advised to the contrary.  If you are having any problems with your learning on the module please raise them so we can advise you on the best way forward.  Do not hold on to any particular problems you may be having with the module – please get in touch.

 

Module Lead:           Michelle McLardy

Contact Deatils:            m.mclardy@derby.ac.uk   

 

LEVEL 6 (YEAR 3 UG) MARKING DESCRIPTORS

GRADE ELEMENT DESCRIPTOR CLASS EVIDENCE
100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

90

Knowledge Work is exceptional, logically presented and error-free.  It is creative and illustrates a thorough in-depth understanding of the content as well as issues and problems.  There is evidence of extensive reading and synthesis of primary research literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st

To achieve a grade in this range you will be providing exceptionally robust evidence of primary reading, with an extremely rigorous analysis, evaluation and interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work will be exceptionally well presented and your attention to detail will be extremely thorough.

 

You will have used academic writing protocols that are at an exceptionally high level that articulates a thoroughly balanced argument of exceptional quality.

Criticality Work shows an exceptional, critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is an outstanding appreciation of relevant competing perspectives
Application Work reflects an extremely strong aptitude for applying knowledge in novel circumstances as well as to more typically work-based scenarios.  Where appropriate, workable solutions to problems are offered
Evaluation The work shows an exceptional level of evaluation and illustrates incisive conclusions based on the evaluation
Communication Work is communicated with an exceptional degree of authority that reflects that expected of professionals in the discipline subject
 
89

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80

Knowledge Work is excellent, logically presented and almost error-free.  It illustrates an in-depth understanding of content as well as issues and problems.  There is evidence of extensive reading and synthesis of almost all primary research literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st

To achieve a grade in this range you will be providing exceptional evidence of primary reading, with an extremely rigorous analysis, evaluation and interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work will be exceptionally well presented and your attention to detail will be thorough.

 

You will have used academic writing protocols that are at an exceptionally high level that articulates a well-balanced argument of exceptional quality.

Criticality Work shows an excellent, critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is an excellent appreciation of almost all the relevant competing perspective
Application Work reflects a very strong aptitude for applying knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances as well as in more typically work-based scenarios.  Where appropriate, there is strong evidence of solutions to problems
Evaluation Work evidences an advanced level of evaluation and illustrates solution focused conclusions based on evaluation
Communication Work is communicated with an excellent degree of authority which is close to the expected level of professionals in the subject discipline

 

 

79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70

Knowledge The work is extremely good, logically presented and relatively error-free.  It illustrates a very advanced understanding of the content as well as issues and problems.  There is clear evidence of a depth of reading and synthesis of primary literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st

To achieve a grade in this range you will be providing extremely robust evidence of primary reading, with a suitably rigorous analysis, evaluation and interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work will be exceptionally well presented and your attention to detail will be thorough.

 

You will have used academic writing protocols that are at an extremely high level that articulates a thoroughly balanced argument of high quality.

Criticality Works shows an extremely good, critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is an extremely good, robust appreciation of a range of relevant competing perspectives
Application Works reflects a rigorous attempt at applying knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances as well as typical work based scenarios.  Where appropriate some workable solutions are offered
Evaluation Work shows an extremely good level of evaluation and illustrates some solution focused conclusions based on evaluation
Communication Work is communicated with an extremely good degree of authority that will at times come close to the expected level of professionals in the subject discipline
 
69

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60

Knowledge Work is very good, logically presented and reasonably error-free.  It illustrates very good understanding of content as well as issues and problems.  There is clear evidence of some depth of reading and attempted synthesis of the literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:I

In achieving a grade in this range you will be providing very robust evidence of primary reading, with a rigorous analysis, evaluation and interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work will be very well presented and your attention to detail will be thorough.

 

You will have used academic writing protocols that are at a high level that articulates a very balanced argument of high quality.

Criticality Work shows a very good, critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is a very good appreciation of relevant competing perspectives
Application Work reflects clear attempts at applying knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances as well as typical work based scenarios.  Where appropriate some attempt at workable solutions are made
Evaluation Work shows a very good level of evaluation and may illustrate a few solution focused conclusions
Communication Work is communicated with some measure of authority and comes reasonably close to the expected level of professionals in the subject discipline

 

 

59

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

Knowledge Work is at a good standard with clear attempts to present it logically and is reasonably error-free.  It illustrates a good understanding of content as well as issues and problems.  There may be some evidence of reading but little synthesis of the primary literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:II

Achieving a grade in this range will mean your work has clear evidence of primary reading, with a relatively good level of analysis, evaluation and interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work is well presented and your attention to detail will be suitably thorough.

 

You will have used academic writing protocols that are at a good standard that articulates a sound balance of argument to a reasonable quality.

Criticality Work has some fairly good level of critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is a fair appreciation of some relevant competing perspectives
Application Work reflects an attempt to apply knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances and to typical word-based scenarios
Evaluation Work evidences a good level of evaluation, perhaps illustrating some level of solution focused conclusions
Communication Work is communicated without much authority.  It will require some development to achieve the expected level of professionals in the subject discipline
 
49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40

Knowledge Work demonstrates a satisfactory level of knowledge, with limited evidence of reading primary literature  

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd

Achieving grades at this level is likely to mean you are providing some evidence of primary reading, with limited interpretation of the literature in the context to which it is applied.

 

The work is sound with a reasonable level of attention to presentation but level of detail will exhibit errors.

 

You will have used some academic writing protocols and the balance of argument is sound, although may not be particularly strong.

Criticality Work demonstrates a fair level of critical engagement with complex ideas and concepts.  There is little appreciation of relevant competing perspectives
Application Work offers limited application of knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances, but is able to evidence some links to typical work-based scenarios
Evaluation Work shows a fair level of evaluation but illustration of solution focused conclusions is limited
Communication Work is soundly presented but lacks authority.  Weaknesses in style and structure mean it does not come close to the expected level of professionals in the subject discipline

 

 

39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

35

Knowledge The work is limited and not logically presented and has errors.  There is little illustration of understanding of content or the issues and problems.  There is little evidence of primary reading  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ref /

Comp

Achieving grades in this range is likely to mean that there is little evidence of primary reading.  The analysis and interpretation will be of a very limited quality and value.

 

The work presented will pay little attention to detail and is likely to evidence an increased number of errors.

 

You will have used little evidence of appropriate academic writing protocols with a poor balance of argument.

Criticality The work lacks much critical engagement with ideas and concepts.  There is unlikely to be any appreciation of relevant competing perspectives
Application Work demonstrates very little attempt at applying knowledge in unusual and / or novel circumstances.  There is little evidence of links to work-based scenarios
Evaluation Work shows inadequate evaluation and no reference to solutions focused conclusions
Communication Work is communicated in an unacceptable way.  It is not close to the level expected of professionals in the subject discipline
 
34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Knowledge Work is very poor and contains quite a number of errors.  There is very little if any illustration of understanding of the content, issues or problems.  There is very little or no evidence of primary reading  

 

 

 

 

 

Ref

 

Achieving grades in this range is likely to mean there is virtually no evidence of appropriate primary reading with no evident analysis or interpretation.  The work is likely to be descriptive with no evidence to apply to context and provide some interpretation.

 

The work is likely to be very poor in construction of ideas and general presentation.  The attention to detail will be extremely poor. 

 

You will have used no appropriate academic writing protocols and the balance of argument will not evidence understanding.

Criticality Work lacks critical engagement with ideas and concepts.  There is very little or no appreciation of relevant competing perspectives
Application Work demonstrates a poor attempt at applying knowledge.  The links to work-based scenarios is not evidenced in any way
Evaluation Work shows little or no evaluation with no reference to solutions or pertinent conclusions
Communication Work is communicated poorly with little or no relevancy to the work expected of professionals in the subject discipline

 

 

SCHEME OF WORK

 

WEEK BEGINNING LECTURE FOCUS TUTORIAL

Selected Reading (Recommended)

1

1st October

Module Introduction: The Changing Context of International Human Resource Management FORMAL LAUNCH OF ASSESSMENT 1

J.     Kapoor B and Sherif J (2012) Global human resources (HR) information systems. Kybernetes, 41 (1/2) pp229-238

J.     Tung R L (2016) New perspectives on human resource management in a global context. Journal of World Business, 51(1) pp142-152

B.    Armstrong M (2016) Armstrong’s Handbook of Strategic Human Resource Management (6th edition). London: Kogan Page (Chapter 21: pp247-257)

B.    Bratton J and Gold J (2012) Human Resource Management: Theory & Practice (5th edition). (Chapter 15: pp500-529)

2

8th Oct

The Role of Multinational Corporations J.     Gunnigle P, Lavelle J and Monaghan S (2013) Weathering the storm? Multinational companies and human resource management through the global financial crisis. International Journal of Manpower, 34 (3) pp214-231

J.     Thite M (2012) Strategic global human resource management: Case study of an emerging Indian multinational. Human Resource Development International, 15(2) pp239-247

B.    Briscoe D, Schuler R and Tarique I (2012) International Human Resource Management: Policies and Practices for Multinational Enterprises (4th edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge (Chapter 3: pp58-82)

B.    Ożogo E and Brewster C (2015) ‘Knowledge flows in MNEs and the role of HRM’. In Machado C (Ed) International Human Resource Management, London: Springer, pp21-36

 

 

3

15th Oct

Convergent and Divergent HRM in International Business J.     Budhwar P S, Varma and Patel C (2016) Convergence – divergence of HRM in the Asia-Pacific: Context specific analysis and future research agenda. Human Resource Management Review, 26 (4) pp311-326

J.     Vance C M, Chow H S, Pail Y and Shin K-Y (2013) Analysis of Korean expatriate congruence with Chinese labour perceptions on training method importance: Implications for global talent management. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 24 (5) pp985-1005

B.    Armstrong M (2016) Armstrong’s Handbook of Strategic Human Resource Management (6th edition). London: Kogan Page (Chapter 20: pp237-246)

B.    Brewster C, Houldsworth E, Sparrow P and Vernon G (2016) International Human Resource Management (4th edition). London: CIPD (Chapter 1: pp1-24)

4

22nd Oct

Managing an Internationally Diverse Workforce J.     Al Ariss A and Guo G C (2016) Job allocations as cultural sorting in a culturally diverse organizational context. International Business Review, 25(2) pp579-588

J.     Podsiadlowski A, Gröschke D, Kogler M, Springer C & van der Zee K (2013) Managing a culturally diverse workforce: Diversity perspectives in organizations. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 37(2) pp159-175

B.    Hollinshead G (2010) International and Comparative Human Resource Management. Maidenhead, Berks: McGraw-Hill (Chapter 2: pp23-46)

B.    Trompenaars A and Hampden-Turner C (2012) Riding the waves of Culture (3rd edition). London: Nicholas Brealey (Chapter 15: pp301-342

5

29th Oct

·       WORKSHOP 1:  Group Poster Presentation

 

 

6

5th Nov

Culture Perceptions: Understanding Cultural Dimensions J.     Cho J, Morris M W, Slepian M L & Tadmor C T (2017) Choosing fusion: The effects of diversity ideologies on preference for culturally mixed experiences. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 69 pp163-171

J.     Hauff S and Kirchner S (2015) Identifying work value patterns: Cross national comparison and historical dynamics. International Journal of Manpower, 36 (2) pp151-168

B.    Trompenaars A and Hampden-Turner C (2012) Riding the waves of Culture (3rd edition). London: Nicholas Brealey (Chapter 11: pp193-222

B.    Zhang C and Iles P (2013) ‘National Differences, Culture and IHRM’. In Iles P and Zhang C (Eds) International Human Resource Management: A cross-cultural and comparative approach. London: CIPD, pp19-36

7

12th Nov

Business Across Borders: The Role of the Expatriate & the Host Country Context J.     Heizmann H, Fee A and Gray S J (2018) Intercultural knowledge sharing between expatriates and host-country nationals in Vietnam: A practice based study of communicative relations and power dynamics. Journal of International Management, 24 (1) pp16-32

J.     Shen J, Kang H and Dowling P J (2018) Conditional Altruism: Effects of HRM practices on the willingness of host country nationals to help expatriates. Human Resource Management, 57 (1) pp355-364

B.    Grimshaw D, Rubery J and Almond P (2011) ‘Multinational Companies and the Host Country Environment’. In Harzing A-W and Pinnington A H (Eds) International Human Resource Management (3rd edition). London: Sage Publications, pp228-266

B.    Morley M J and Parkinson E (2015) ‘A practice with potential: Expatriate cross-cultural training among Irish MNCs’. In Machado C (Ed) International Human Resource Management, London: Springer, pp75-90

 

 

8

26th Nov

Labour Relations: An International Perspective J.     Croucher R (2015) National and international labour relations in oil and gas Transnational Corporations in Kazakhstan. International Business Review, 24 (6) pp948-954

J.     Henriques M P (2016) Labour human rights in Portugal: Challenges to their effectiveness. Oñati Socio-Legal Series, 6 (3) pp520-542

B.    Currie D and Teague P (2016) ‘How does European integration influence employment relations’. In Dickmann M, Brewster C and Sparrow P (Eds) International Human Resource Management: A Contemporary HR Issues in Europe, New York: Routledge, pp21-48

B.    Briscoe D, Schuler R and Tarique I (2012) International Human Resource Management: Policies and Practices for Multinational Enterprises (4th edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge (Chapter 9: pp221-253)

9

2nd Dec

Managing Performance in an International Business: Comparative Complexities and Challenges J.     Mura L (2012) Performance of human resource management in an internationally operating company. Serbian Journal of Management, 7 (1) pp115-129

J.     Slavic A, Berber N and Lekovic (2014) Performance Management in International Human Resource Management: Evidence from the CEE region. Serbian Journal of Management, 9 (1) pp45-58

B.    Brewster C, Houldsworth E, Sparrow P and Vernon G (2016) International Human Resource Management (4th edition). London: CIPD (Chapter 9: pp223-251)

Sahakiants I, Festing M and Perkins S (2016) ‘Pay for Performance in Europe’. In Dickmann M, Brewster C and Sparrow P (Eds) International Human Resource Management: A Contemporary HR Issues in Europe, New York: Routledge, pp354-374

10

18th Nov

Sourcing & Retaining Talent: Assessing and Developing the International Workforce FORMAL LAUNCH OF ASSESSMENT 2

J.     Collings D G and Isichei M (2018) The shifting boundaries of global staffing: Integrating global talent management, alternative forms of international assignments and non-employees into the discussion. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 29 (1) pp165-187

J.     King K A (2015) Global talent management: Introducing a strategic framework and multiple-actors model. Journal of Global Mobility, 3 (2) pp273-288

B.    McDonnell A and Collings D G (2011) ‘The identification and evaluation of talent’. In Scullion H and Collings D G (Eds) Global Talent Management. London: Routledge, pp56-73

B.    Briscoe D, Schuler R and Tarique I (2012) International Human Resource Management: Policies and Practices for Multinational Enterprises (4th edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge (Chapter 3: pp58-82)

11

9th Dec

The Trend of International Business: Future Challenges in Managing Human Resource J.     Al Ariss A and Sidani Y (2016) Comparative international human resource management: Future research directions. Human Resource Management Review, 26 (4) pp352-358

J.     Cascio W F and Boudreau J W (2016) The search for global competence: From international HR to talent management. Journal of World Business, 51 (1) pp103-114

B.    Briscoe D, Schuler R and Tarique I (2012) International Human Resource Management: Policies and Practices for Multinational Enterprises (4th edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge (Chapter 15: pp411-431)

B.    Wilton N (2013) An Introduction to Human Resource Management (2nd edition). London: Sage Publications (Chapter 15: pp385-408)

12

17th Dec

·        Workshop 2
PLEASE NOTE

Assignment is due Friday 18th December 2020

at 11:59pm (UK time)

 

 

MODULE RESOURCES

 

  • WHILE THE RANGE OF RESOURCES IN TERMS OF BOOKS AND JOURNAL ARTICLES PROVIDED IN THIS HANDBOOK IS EXTENSIVE, IT IS ONLY AN INDICATIVE LIST OF THE AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON THE TOPIC AREAS IN THIS MODULE.
  • THE LIST IS NOT INTENDED TO BE AN INDICATION OF THE BOOKS OR JOURNALS THAT MUST BE READ, BUT SIMPLY PROVIDES A GUIDE FOR PARTICIPANTS TO RECOGNISE AND APPRECIATE THE BREADTH OF AVAILABLE LEARNING MATERIALS. ALL THE RESOURCES IDENTIFIED HERE ARE AVAILABLE EITHER AS A PHYSICAL COPY (BOOK IN THE LIBRARY) OR ELECTRONICALLY (E-BOOK; E-JOURNAL).
  • MODULE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE EXPECTED TO ACTIVELY ENGAGE, INITIATE AND WIDEN THE SEARCH FOR ADDITIONAL READING MATERIALS TO SUPPLEMENT THEIR LEARNING IN THE SUBJECT AREA(S) WHERE IT IS APPROPRIATE TO DO SO. NOTE THAT MANY OF THE GENERAL BOOKS ON HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WILL ALSO INCLUDE SOME ELEMENT OR DIMENSION OF INTERNATIONAL HRM.

 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Brewster C, Houldsworth E, Sparrow P and Vernon G (2016) International Human Resource Management (4th edition). London: CIPD (658.3BRE)

Hollinshead G (2010) International and Comparative Human Resource Management. London: McGraw-Hill (658.3HOL)

 

OTHER USEFUL TEXTS

Armstrong M and Taylor S (2017) Armstrong’s Handbook of Human Resource Management (14th edition). London: Kogan Page (658.3ARM)

Bamber G, Lansbury R D and Wailes N (2011) International and Comparative Employment Relations: Globalisation and change (5th edition). London: Sage Publication (331INT)

Bratton J & Gold J (2012) Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice (5th edition). Basingstoke, Hants: Palgrave Macmillan (658.3BRA & e-book)

Briscoe D, Schuler R and Tarique I (2012) International Human Resource Management: Policies and Practices for Multinational Enterprises (4th edition). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge (658.3BRI & e-book)

Crawshaw J, Budhwar P and Davis A (Eds) (2017) Human Resource Management: Strategic and International Perspectives (2nd edition). London: Sage Publications (658.3HUM)

Christopher E (2012) International Management: Explorations across cultures. London: Kogan page (658.049CHR)

Collinson S, Narula R and Rugman A M (2017) International Business (7th edition). Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd (e-book only)

Czinkota M R, Ronkainen I A and Moffett M H (2010) International Business (8th edition). Chichester, Sussex: John Wiley (658.049CZI)

Deresky H (2017) International Management, Managing across borders and cultures: Text and Cases (9th edition). Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd (e-book only)

Dibben P, Wood G and Kierck G (2011) Employment Relations: A critical and international approach. London: CIPD (331DIB)

Dickmann M, Brewster C and Sparrow P (Eds) (2016) International Human Resource Management: A Contemporary HR Issues in Europe (3rd edition). London: Routledge (e-book only)

Dowling P J, Festing M and Engle Snr A D (2013) International Human Resource Management: Managing People in a Multinational Context (6th edition). London: Thomson Learning (658.3DOW)

French R (2010) Cross-Cultural Management in Work Organisations (2nd edition). London: CIPD (658.049FRE)

Gennard J, Judge G, Bennett A and Saundry R (2016) Managing Employment Relations (6th edition). London: CIPD (658.315GEN)

Griffin R W and Pustay M W (2015) International Business: A Managerial Perspective (8th edition). Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd (658.049GRI & e-book)

Harzing A-W and Pinnington A H (Eds) (2011) International Human Resource Management (3rd edition). London: Sage Publications (658.3INT)

Hill C W L and Hult G T M (2017) International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace (11th edition). London: McGraw-Hill (658.049HIL)

Hofstede G H, Hofstede G J and Minkov M (2010) Culture and Organizations, Software of the Mind: Intercultural Cooperation and its Importance for Survival (3rd edition). London: McGraw-Hill (e-book only)

Iles P and Zhang C (2013) International Human Resource Management: A Cross-cultural and Comparative Approach. London: CIPD (658.3ILE)

Johnson D and Turner C (2012) European Business (3rd edition). London: Routledge (658.0490722JOH)

Kew J and Stredwick J (2013) Human Resource Management in a Business Context (2nd edition). London: CIPD (658.3KEW)

Leat M (2012) Exploring Employee Relations (3rd edition). Saint Louis, MO: Taylor and Francis (e-book only)

Luthans F, Doh J P and Hodgetts R M (2009) International Business: Culture, Strategy and Behavior (7th edition). London: McGraw-Hill (658.049LUT)

Machado C (Ed) (2015) International Human Resource Management: Challenges and Changes. London: Springer Publishing (e-book only)

Morrison J (2009) International Business: Challenges in a Changing World. Basingstoke, Hants: Palgrave Macmillan (658.049MOR & e-book)

Özbilgin M, Groutsis D and Harvey W S (Eds) (2014) International Human Resource Management. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (658.3INT)

Sargeant M and Lewis D (2018) Employment Law (8th edition). London: Routledge (344.01SAR)

Schein E H (2009) The Corporate Culture Survival Guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass (e-book only)

Torrington D, Hall L, Taylor S and Atkinson C (2017) Human Resource Management (10th edition). Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd (658.3TOR & e-book)

Trompenaars A and Hampden-Turner C (2012) Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business (3rd edition). London: Nicholas Brealey (e-book only)

Wilton N (2016) An Introduction to Human Resource Management (3rd edition). London: Sage publications (658.3WIL)

SELECTED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Aichorn N and Puck J (2017) Bridging the language gap in multinational companies: Language strategies and the notion of company speak. Journal of World Business, 52 (3) pp386-403

Alcázar F M, Fernández P M R and Gardey G S (2013) Workforce diversity in strategic human resource management models: A critical review of the literature and implications for future research. Cross Cultural Management, 20 (1) pp39-49

Amal M, Awuah G B, Raboch H and Andersson S (2013) Differences and similarities of the internationalization processes of multinational companies from developed and emerging countries. European Business Review, 25 (5) pp411-428

Amin M, Khairuzzaman W, Ismail W, Zaleha S, Rasid A, Daverson R and Selemani A (2014) The impact of human resource management practices on performance: Evidence from a public university. The TQM Journal, 26 (2) pp125-142

Đorđević B (2016) Impact of National Culture on International Human Resource Management. Ekononske Teme (Economic Themes), 54 (2) pp281-300

Edwards T, Jalette P and Tregaskis O (2012) To what extent is there regional logic in the management of labour in multinational companies? Evidence from Europe and North America. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23 (12) pp2468-2490

Fan D, Zhang M and Zhu J (2013) International human resource management strategies of Chinese multinationals operating abroad. Asia Pacific Business Review, 19 (4) pp526-541

Fitzgerald R and Rowley C (2016) Internationalization patterns and the evolution of multinational companies: Comparing Japan, Korea, China and India. Asia Pacific Business Review, 22 (4) pp523-533

Gannon J M, Roper A and Doherty L (2015) Strategic human resource management: Insights from the international hotel industry. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 47 pp65-75

Haal-Saheem W, Festing M and Darwish T K (2017) International Human Resource Management in the Arab Gulf States: An Institutional Perspective. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28 (18) pp2684-2712

Kirk S (2016) Career capital in global Kaleidoscope Careers: The role of HRM. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 27 (6) pp681-697

Kotabe M and Kothari T (2016) Emerging market multinational companies’ evolutionary path to building a competitive advantage from emerging markets to developed countries. Journal of World Business, 51 (5) 729-743

Kwon B, Farndale E and Park J G (2016) Employee voice and work engagement: Macro, meso and micro-level drivers of convergence. Human Resource Management Review, 26 (4) pp327-337

Mobärg M (2012) English proficiency and attitude formation in a merged corporation with a Swedish-English profile. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 33 (2) pp149-165

Moore F (2015) An unsuitable job for a woman: A ‘native category’ approach to gender, diversity and cross-cultural management. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 26 (2) pp216-230

Ogrean C (2017) A snapshot of the world of global multinationals – An industry based analysis of Fortune Global 500 Companies. Studies in Business and Economics, 12 (2) pp136-154

Robak S (2014) “Culture Programs,” Culture Differences, Knowledge Resources and their Impacts on Learning Cultures in Transnational Enterprises in China. European Education, 46 (4) pp61-81

Suutari V, Brewster C, Mäkelä L, Dickmann M and Tornikoski C (2017) The effect of international work experience on the career success of expatriates: A comparison of assigned and self-initiated expatriates. Human Resource Management, 57 (1) pp37-54

Tâu N (2017) Human environment and cultural influence on the development of international business. Eastern European Journal of Regional Studies, 3 (2) pp82-92

Vetráková M, Seková M and Ďurian J (2015) Organizational culture and human resources management in multinational companies under the conditions of intercultural environment. Economic Processes Management, 3 (4) pp56-71

Volpone S D, Marquardt D J, Casper W J and Avery D R (2018) Minimizing cross-cultural maladaptation: How minority status facilitates change in international acculturation. Journal of Applied Psychology, 103 (3) pp249-269

Xing Y, Liu Y, Tarba S Y and Cooper C L (2016) Intercultural influences on managing African employees of Chinese firms in Africa: Chinese managers’ HRM practices. International Business Review, 25 (1) pp28-41

KEY CONTACTS

 

NAME EMAIL TELEPHONE
Michelle McLardy (Module Lead) m.mclardy@derby.ac.uk  
Caroline Ball

(Academic Subject Advisor) – UoD Library

c.ball@derby.ac.uk 591212
SERVICES LOCATION TELEPHONE / EMAIL
Faculty Reception (BLSS) E406 (East  Tower – Kedleston Road Campus) 591896
Student Support and Advisory Services Ground Floor (KR Campus) 591311
Student Wellbeing Ground Floor T Block (KR Campus) 593000

Studentwellbeing@derby.ac.uk

Student’s Union Advice Team UDSU Block (KR Campus) 591507

advice@derbyunion.co.uk