Conversation Article

Conversation Article – some tips

 

  • Aim is to communicate your research question with a general audience.

 

  • The tone of the piece will depend largely on you – see Week 5 tutorial for examples of some tones. Use a CONSISTENT tone throughout your article.

 

  • A picture(s) and/or figure/chart (s) can be included (but do not put up great reams of data and superfluous pictures).

 

  • Use Hyperlinks for citing literature.
    • To hyperlink to an article you need to find the original source of the article and insert the url address eg. http://www.publish.csiro.au/CP/CP17306. If the full text isn’t available (or requires login) that is ok (it would be the reader’s choice if they wish to access your source articles).
    • To hyperlink to a book/book chapter try and find the publisher url link and include that in the hyperlink (e.g. https://www.cabi.org/bookshop/book/9781780644837
    • Hyperlinks to other Conversation articles or Organisation website (e.g. FAO) are acceptable.

 

  • In addition to the Hyperlinks, please include a properly formatted Reference list at the end – listing the references you used in your hyperlinks within the document.

 

 

“A good article to The Conversation has a lightness and air of expectation about it. It should be written in a way that any non-expert can understand and get excited about. It is not only an expression of your interests, but also a statement of your intentions and findings. So it needs to be a logical statement of a problem that you have investigated and how you resolved it.”

 

It is in this written piece, and every bit of work that follows, that you get the chance to answer your research question.

A good article to The Conversation has a lightness and air of expectation about it. It should be written in a way that any non-expert can understand and get excited about. It is not only an expression of your interests, but also a statement of your intentions and findings. So it needs to be a logical statement of a problem that you have investigated and how you resolved it.  In your careers you will write, read and deal with many documents like this, so get used to it.

The form this approximately 1000 word piece should take is of an article to The Conversation (see http://theconversation.com/au (Links to an external site.)). The tone of the piece will depend largely on you, but you should check The Conversations charter (https://theconversation.com/au/charter (Links to an external site.)). The layout, colours and fonts for the submission are up to you as The Conversation does not specify its own style that you must follow.  However, it should be noted that The Conversation uses hyperlinks for citing literature.  You need to follow this convention in this written piece.

In submitting this assignment, clearly of importance is the 1000 words that address the problem you looked at, the aims you pursued, the methods or way you went about it, data you used, the results you obtained and the implications you found.

You are encouraged to include tables and figures in your article (which are not included in the word count).  Please remember there is a need to inform audiences in a succinct way, so do not put up great reams of data and superfluous pictures.  Choose carefully, as you will be marked on it.