Disscussion

Coure: Lifespan developmental Psychology:

DISCUSSION POST #1: Developmental Milestones

Top of Form

Evaluate how the Central Process of role experimentation can impact an individual and how the role of the environment impacts it. Include an example to illustrate your thoughts.

Bottom of Form

Initial post #1:

From: Kristie Balogh 

RE: Developmental Milestones

Top of Form

Later adolescents often experiment with different roles that help them to consider possibilities for their future identities. This is known as the central process of role experimentation. One example of this is a college student who changes their major. Going into college as a freshman, a student might be really interested in English and decide to major in that subject. In their sophomore year, they might realize that they are just as interested in Psychology and can see themselves in a career in that field. Changing their major might be a hassle, but after a summer of reading Psychology books, talking to their Psychology major friends, etc, the change could be the best option. This change might occur several more times if the student continues to reevaluate their decisions, but as time goes by, their confidence is likely to become greater and they will reevaluate things less, leading to commitment.

Environmental factors can impact the process of role experimentation. For example, if a college student keeps on changing their major and career goals, their family might pressure them to make up their mind and stick to one goal. This could lead to the student just settling to appease their family instead of continuing the experimentation process to discover the choice that best suits them. When I took a break from college after earning my Associates Degree, my father was not pleased at all. He gave me a hard time about it for months, but my mother was more understanding because she knew I not only mentally needed the break, but that one way or another I would find the right path for myself. When I made the decision to continue my education, I felt that it was the right time. Even though I am still very busy, I find myself in the right frame of mind when it comes to doing my coursework and studying.  If I had not taken the break when I did, I might not have performed to my fullest potential. It is important for individuals to be able to explore all possibilities instead of settling for just one option.

Bottom of Form

Write your response here to the post above.

Initial post #2:

Casey Horn 

RE: Developmental Milestones

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Hi class.

The Central Process of role experimentation is the concept of one’s identity status. In later adolescents, one might try different roles to figure out where their values and interests lie by jobs, college courses, who they associate with (Newman 2015). An example of this is demonstrated in the text which states a college student continuously bouncing between different interests of majors, but continues to go back to the same one, law. Just as he is coming to this final decision, he goes into a period called psychosocial moratorium. Psychosocial moratorium is the stage before finally settling into his final role, sometimes even called a ‘gap year’ for college students to be sure of their decision and the path they are planning to take (Newman 2015).Three types of approaches to identity searching; the informational types who are actively seeking information to finalize a decision, the normative types  who are more closed off to feedback, and the diffuse-avoidant types which push off making a decision as long as possible (Newman 2015). Outside factors that can impact role experimentation can come from a variety of sources including friends or family members, cultural expectations,or influence from one’s academic advisors. As stated previously, there are three approaches to identity searching, and can conflict when outside factors come into play. For example, One who is willing to receive feedback to make a decision might request from these outside sources for their thoughts so they can actively make a decision (Newman 2015). Differently, the two others are those who are more closed off and less willing to hear suggestions(Newman 2015).. These environmental factors can cause a big strain because in addition to finding their place in society based on their personal strengths, it can become frustrating and confusing to have so many varying opinions. In some cultures, the children are expected to go into certain fields, regardless of whether that is their interest or not. Similarly, there might be pressure from parents to make a decision and not take a year off. All of these things compiled together show how there can be negative and positive impacts from environmental sources when Role experimentation is taking place.

 

Source: Newman & Newman. (2015). Development through Life: A Psychosocial Approach, 12th ed.

Bottom of Form

Write your response here to the post above.

Initial post #3:

2 days ago

AnnMarie Christie 

RE: Developmental Milestones

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Role experimentation process gives an individual the advantage to take on as many roles as they can to explore the possibilities of their identity for their future. Many people at this stage in life are trying to figure out their identities and make decisions that could determine their futures. They are faced with many opportunities where they can try different roles to help them decide on what’s in their best interest. They may explore many different possibilities before they finally discover what is the right fit for them and this is a natural process that almost every individual has in life and when transitioning into adulthood. For example, an individual who consistently changes careers or majors because they developed an interest in something else other than what they were originally focused on or what they originally planned for. They may have tried several times to commit to other careers but as they make the choices they start to identify their strengths and develop confidence and take on the role they want to commit to long term. The role of experimentation can be impacted by environmental factors such as peers, advisors or maybe due to culture based on beliefs, values, or traditions. My daughter who is a junior in college is majoring in criminal justice and biology. Originally she had gone in focusing solely on biology but eventually developed an interest in criminal justice and as she took more of those classes her interest in pursuing a career down that path grew as well. She has an interest in both medical school and law school and frequently goes back and forth between which career path she would rather choose. She is very strong in her criminal justice classes and has received all A’s in them. Given this and her big interest in biology her advisors suggested that she combined the two into a career and look into paths such as forensics, and other advisors also suggested that she go to law school since she is such a strong student in the field. I can see how this could influence her into looking more into a criminal justice based career whether it be a lawyer or forensics since she might feel pressure to go this route given these circumstances. Environmental factors can be a heavy burden, trying to find the right path for you, and it may add pressure to the already stressful decisions that a person in this stage will have to make about their future. They feel pressured because not only are they trying to adhere to what society might think they should do such as parents or peers, but they are also trying to find their own path that will be right for them. At this stage people are making a lot of life changing decisions about their futures and it may be overwhelming if they are afraid that their choices might not be accepted by the people around them. This is why it is important to encourage people at this age to pursue what they feel is right and what they have a passion for, even if they change their mind often, eventually it will lead them to the right path.

Bottom of Form

Write your response here to the post above.

Initial post #4: 2 days ago

Patricia Gonzalez 

RE: Developmental Milestones

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Hi everybody,

Central process role experimentation suggests that adolescents experiment with different roles until they discover they final identity. They also explore different opportunities that help them to discover what things they like or dislike, what characteristic they have for different jobs, what kind of career they feel they fit better, inclusive what kind of parter they would like to marry some day. In order for the teens to know that they have to experience and get actively involved in different activities and with different people. For example, they may get different types of job in order to develop and discover their skills. They may also explore or change careers or do voluntary jobs in order to know which career path should go. And they also get involved in romantic/sexual relationship. This is how they are discovering and forming an image of their future spouse and self presentation. Religion and politics are also part of the central role experimentation. Teens may get involved in different religions and belief. During this period they seem to be unstable or not committed to some of their activities or plans and thats normal. They reevaluate their decisions many times until they are confident to commit and stick to their desire and vision.

The environment can affect this process, specially the parents. As parents observe the process of role experimentation,  they may become concerned because their adolescent son  or daughter appears to be abandoning the traditional family  value orientation or lifestyle (Newman& Newman, 2015). When parents don’t understand this process they will want to see they son/ daughter already stable and settled down. This can cause a lot of problem in their relationship because the teen will be more locked to his/her decision  contradicting their parent. Parents need to learn to trust their kids during these process.

Bottom of Form

Write your response here to the post above.

Initial post #5:

2 days ago

Jennifer Montero 

RE: Developmental Milestones

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Hi everybody,

As humans we have this internal goal of figuring out who we are. When we are kids and asked what do we want to be when we are older, we answer with responses such as “ballerina”, “astronaut”, “cowboy, “princess” and personally “backup dancer” but as we get older those responses usually change. The journey that we go on to figure it out is life itself. We try new things often to get a feel for it and maybe it will also change what we want to be in life or just reinforce it. We go through a central process called role experimentation where we explore different roles that will or will not show potential for our future identity. Roles such as joining clubs in school, taking internships, different jobs, changing majors, etc can allow individuals to picture themselves in a specific career or group.

The role of environment can impact the role of experimentation in positive and negative ways. An individuals family can impact what roles they decide to experiment with. For example, when I was in middle school I had to decide what high school I wanted to go to and I wanted to go to an arts academy to study dance. However, my parents would tell me that dance was not a career or that it was a career that was not going to bring me any good income. Their words almost discouraged me from going to the school but I did it anyways. So the words from those close to you can impact what you want to try out. Second, todays society views can really impact what career path you want to follow. For example, today with the negative representation police officers have been gaining, a lot of younger people are now debating if they want to be a cop because they do not want to be looked at in a bad way. Lastly, the gender binary roles that are within society or surrounding a person. Some women may be discouraged to try a role where the role is usually male dominated like a director or she may be motivated to try harder to succeed and dominate the role herself. Even within her own family, they may expect her to just bear children and be a stay at home mom but she wants to actually wants to pursue a career. One should just follow whatever their heart desires.

Write your response here to the post above.

STARTING HERE IS FOR A DIFFERENT DISCUSSION POST.

DISCUSSION POST #2: Friendship

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Do you think the concepts of popularity and unpopularity are more important in adolescents in industrialized societies or traditional cultures? Why?

Initial post # 1

3 days ago

Fany Herrera 

RE: Friendship

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

In today’s society, adolescents are more inclined to reach and attain a certain status of popularity if they grew up in an industrialized society compared to those raised in traditional cultures. This is due to the main fact that in industrialized societies, people have more time to focus on other interests, to the point of obsessing over trivial matters such as being a social status for a couple of years in school. In traditional cultures, adolescents are succumbed to follow the norms that their older generation has instilled upon them to be accepted in their society. They are more likely to focus on satiating basic necessities such as hunger, shelter, familiar bonds, and so on. This doesn’t allow them to focus more onto their self-image, thus not interested in the opinions of anyone else watching them. As for adolescents raised in industrialized society, the society itself gives adolescents a way to present themselves to each other. For example, fast fashion industries such as Forever 21 and Levi’s constantly produce the newest and hottest take on what to wear, allowing adolescents to be influenced to buy their outfits to be able to “fit in with the crowd”. Another example could be, TV shows and movies portraying how school life should be. They clearly depict certain interests has to have a certain mentality, like the jocks being uneducated and nerds being physically weak.

Write your response to the post above:

Initial post # 2

3 days ago

Matthew Colon 

RE: Friendship

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

During this time the concepts of popularity and unpopularity are more important in adolescents in industrialized societies. Everywhere now there are social media that gives them a concept of how they should look and act to be “popular”. With the social connections that are involved it plays a big role in our everyday lives, it is our focus every day to act right, dressing up to trends, to make sure you match the social status. Depending on our social status, people make more connections through social media instead of working up to it supposedly. For example, Instagram now has small businesses that look for certain people with many followers and look “pretty” on social media to promote their business while others would not get those connections because they don’t post up to standard. However, in traditional cultures, there is a different meaning to popularity and unpopularity. In traditional cultures, the focus is on necessities and who has more. What I mean by that is in the adolescent’s age their focuses is having food, family, shelter, and safety. Those who have more tend to be more popular since they have all the basic needs and could live more freely without worry while others who have less have to work at an early age, dropping out of school to help their own family. The social status is through wealth, who has more has more “friends” and “connections” and if the social status of wealth is low is looked down upon. Overall, the popularity and unpopularity are based differently in different societies.

Bottom of Form

Write your response to the post above:

Initial post # 3

3 days ago

Katy Polanco 

RE: Friendship

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

I think that in both industrialized societies and traditional cultures popularity is a big part of an adolescent’s life. It can either deteriorate their confidence levels, or cause them to be at an all time high. During the ages of adolescence, the earlier the more i think popularity plays a more significants role in how they act and the decisions they make, however, I feel as though it is pretty much the same in in both industrialized societies and traditional cultures. It is normal for kids to want to fit in no matter where you are. The popular kids see to be what most of the adolescent strives to be, but that means you have to reach certain standards.

While entering adulthood, it does seem to exist a little more in industrialized countries rather than tradition cultures. Traditional cultures after a certain age depend on their young adults to start bringing in money, and worrying about their family, they don’t really seem to have much time for the idea of popularity although it still exist. In industrialized societies it seems that even well past adulthood it matters. In order to get a promotion at a job, you must be well liked to strive in any environment without getting dragged down. Industrialized societies tend to practice more individualism than collectivism, so theres more time to focus on ourselves, more time to critique ourselves, and more opportunity to point out who we want to be like.

Bottom of Form

Write your response to the post above:

Initial post # 4

2 days ago

Kira Magan 

RE: Friendship

COLLAPSE

Top of Form

Hi Class,

The idea of popularity and unpopularity is definitely a big deal in adolescence. Teens rate themselves based on whether they are popular or not and they construct their lives around it. Industrialized societies put more pressure on their adolescents to become popular because they are countries that value individualism over collectivism. A society that is industrialized allows their teens to become more of their own people versus traditional cultures that promotes the wellbeing of the family at the expense of the individualism. Teens in traditional cultures are less worried about popularity because they are more focused on being beneficial to the family rather than having their own path in front of them. The idea of popularity would not be as prevalent to some traditional groups because some cultures don’t even require their children to attend school past a certain age and other cultures plan out their children’s marriages. Popularity is mainly a large factor in industrialized societies over traditional societies.

Kira

Write your response to the post above:

Bottom of Form

Bottom of Form

Bottom of Form