Dissertation format

FORMAT

 

Your CHS submission should be presented in a professional manner in terms of appearance and layout, references and quality of illustrations.

 

Many dissertations and essays will follow the standard academic format [i.e. A4 portrait format with black text on a white ground].  However, the topic/theme of your texts might make it more appropriate/interesting to use a different format. We encourage and enjoy innovation and creativity, but do bear in mind your reader’s needs and we strongly recommend that you consult with your tutor your plans for your submission.

 

Format requirements:

While encouraging innovation and creativity, there are some baseline requirements; your submission should:

 

  • be submitted in English

 

  • be an electronic document in PDF format submitted via Moodle
  • be produced in a legible typeface at a size that can be comfortably read

 

  • comply with the 6,000–10,000 word limits [please note that there is no    10% leeway, but that this excludes footnotes, bibliography &                      appendices

 

  • have all pages numbered

 

  • include a cover page which states:

the title of your dissertation/portfolio

your full name

your studio programme

the total word count

the year of submission.

  • include a contents page with page numbers [at the front of the                   submission].  For both the Portfolio and Dissertation routes, please                   indicate clearly where each text/section starts
  • Footnotes (see below, p5)

 

  • List of Illustrations (see p6)

 

  • Appendices (see p6)

 

  • Bibliography (see below, p5)

 

  • Abstract (200 words max), that sets out the broad themes and approaches taken    within your submission

 

  • Five keywords

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

You are required to supply a complete bibliography of all research sources and material consulted.  For the Portfolio route, these should be located at the end of each of the texts submitted; for the Dissertation, this should be located at the end of the dissertation.

 

Your bibliography should include books, articles and exhibition catalogues, reports and interviews, websites, films and other broadcast material that have been consulted as part of your research. Please note that exhibitions and interviews that you have undertaken should also be listed but under separate headings.

We strongly recommend using a bibliographic software package like Zotero, available free online. Help videos on how to use Zotero can be found on the Library Moodle page. The ‘Cite/Export’ function of the Worldcat online catalogue, will also automatically format your references for you.

Bibliographies should be presented alphabetically by author surname and using a consistent style.

 

REFERENCING & FOOTNOTES

 

All works, ideas and words of other authors need to be acknowledged within your text, referenced either by footnotes or using an in-text citation system. You should provide a citation every time you:

  • include a quotation in the text, whether referring to written or oral material (e.g. an interview);
  • refer to data (such as percentages or volumes) that you have taken from another source;
  • invoke the opinion of one of the authors you have read (particularly when this argument forms a substantial part of your dissertation).

Footnotes also offer scope for additional information or signposting to other research that is of interest to your reader, but not key to your main themes and arguments.  Footnotes can be located at the bottom of the page, or as endnotes at the end your dissertation/essay.

Referencing Style: CHS favours the MHRA referencing style, and if you choose another style that you are more familiar with, you are strongly advised to use a standard format for the bibliography and footnotes and to use it consistently throughout your essay/dissertation.

Many websites provide guidelines for formatting your bibliography according to a recognised system; the MHRA system is particularly good for art, design and humanities dissertations. It is available to consult online here. The Library also has guidance on how to reference using MHRA: https://rca.libguides.com/referencing

If you are new to referencing you may also find the Cite Them Right website helpful. Please contact the Library via email or using their Live Chat service for specific help with referencing.

 

ILLUSTRATIONS

 

If used, you need to include:

 

  • A fully referenced list of illustrations at the beginning of your dissertation, following the contents page.
  • Within the dissertation all illustrations must be numbered (e.g. figure 1, figure 2), labelled (with artist, title and date) and referred to within the text.

APPENDICES

 

You may attach appendices of primary research, questionnaires, interview transcripts etc. You should not attach material that is available to the reader elsewhere.

How to reference sources in footnotes and compile your bibliography

 

Note that the footnotes and bibliography items are formatted differently, as follows.

 

Books

 

Footnote: First name of author Last name of author, Title in italics (Place of publication: Name of publisher, year of publication), page number(s) of quotation.

Example: Caroline Evans, Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness 

(New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2003), p.22.

 

Bibliography: Last name of author, First name of author. Title in Italics. Place of publication: Name of publisher, year of publication

Example: Evans, Caroline. Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness. (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2003)

Chapter in edited volume

 

Footnote: First name of author of article or chapter Last name of author, ‘Title of Chapter’, in Title of Book in Italics, ed. First and Last name of editor(s) (Place(s) of publication: Name of publisher, year of publication), page numbers(s) of quotation.

Example: Joanne Entwistle, ‘The Dressed Body’, in Body Dressing, edited by Joanne Entwistle and Elizabeth Wilson (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2001), pp. 33–58 (p.43)

Bibliography: Last name of author, First name of author of article or chapter, ‘Title of Article or Chapter’, in Title of Book in italics, edited by First and Last name of editor(s) (Place(s) of publication: Name of publisher, year), Pages on which chapter appears.

Example: Entwistle, Joanne, ‘The Dressed Body’, in Body Dressing, edited by Joanne Entwistle and Elizabeth Wilson, (Oxford; New York: Berg, 2001), pp. 33–58

Journal/magazine articles

 

Footnote: First Name of Author Last Name of Author, ‘Title of Article’, Title of Magazine in Italics, issue number (year of publication): page number(s) of quotation.

Example: Friedrich Weltzien, ‘Masque-­‐ulinities: Changing Dress as a Display of Masculinity in the Superhero Genre’, Fashion Theory 9 (3) (1995): 229.

Bibliography: Last Name of Author, First Name of Author, ‘Title of Article’, Title of Magazine in Italics, issue number (year of publication): page number(s) of article.

Example: Weltzien, Friedrich, ‘Masque-­‐ulinities: Changing Dress as a Display of Masculinity in the Superhero Genre’, Fashion Theory 9 (3) (1995): 228–31.

Online journal articles

 

Footnote: First Name of Author Last Name of Author, ‘Title of Article’, Title of Magazine in italics, volume number (issue number) (year of publication), page numbers url (accessed date) Example: John Haldane, ‘Anish Kapoor’, Burlington Magazine 1144 (June 2000), 20-­‐23

http://www.jstor.org/stable/887965?&Search=yes&term=kapoor&list=hide& searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoAdvancedSearch%3Fq0%3Dkapoor (accessed 13 March 2015)

Bibliography: First Name of Author Last Name of Author, ‘Title of Article’, Title of Magazine in italics, volume number (issue number) (year and date of publication), page numbers url (accessed date)

Example: John Haldane, ‘Anish Kapoor’, Burlington Magazine 1144 (June 2000) http://www.jstor.org/stable/887965?&Search=yes&term=kapoor&list=hide& searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoAdvancedSearch%3Fq0%3Dkapoor (accessed 13 March 2015)

You should list specific articles plus any runs of magazines, e.g. Vogue (UK), London: Condé Nast, January 2000–December 2004

It is good practice to cite journal articles originating in print format as print publications, even if you have read them online.

Films

 

Title in italics, dir: First then Last name of director, date.

 

Example: Notebook on Cities and Clothes, dir: Wim Wenders, 1989.

 

Exhibitions/museum collections

 

Title in italics, Location, dates.

 

Example: Spectres: When Fashion Turns Back, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 24 February–8 May 2005.

Interviews

 

Author interview with Name, job title, date of interview.

 

Example: Author interview with Shelley Fox, fashion designer, 17 April 2015.

Websites

 

Full url of website (date accessed).

 

Example: http://www.artmargins.com (accessed 25 April 2015).

 

Secondary quotations

 

If you want to quote a source that another author has included within their text, but which has not been read by you, you should use the following format:

Example: Guillaume Apollinaire, ‘Le Poète assassiné’, 1916, quoted in Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project, trans. Howard Eiland and Kevin McLaughlin (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1999), p.19.

Example: Walter Benjamin, quoted in Susan Buck-­‐Morss, The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project (Cambridge, Mass. and London: MIT Press, 1991), p. 184.

Internet source

 

Full url of website (date accessed). Example: http://www.artmargins.com (accessed 25 April 2015).

Further guidance on referencing and the bibliography