Introductory Statistics

 

 

 

 

Unit Outline

 

 

TSTA101  Introductory Statistics

 

 

 

Australian National Institute of Management and Commerce (IMC)              

CRICOS Code: 02491D | TEQSA PRV 12059 | Add: Suite 1, Biomedical Building, 1 Central Ave, Eveleigh NSW 2015

Tel: + 61 2 9209 4888 | Fax: + 61 2 9209 4887 | E-mail: info@top.edu.au | Web: www.imc.edu.au

Top Education Group Ltd ACN 098 139 176 trading as Australian National Institute of Management and Commerce (IMC) 

 

Introduction

 

Welcome to Australian National Institute of Management and Commerce (IMC) and TSTA101 Introductory Statistics. This document provides you with information relevant to the successful completion of this unit including learning outcomes, schedule of lecture topics, prescribed texts and recommended readings, assessment tasks and policies, examinations and learning support facilities.

Academic Administration Office

 

The Academic Administration Office is located at Level 1, Bay 16, Locomotive St. The administration office is your point of contact for advice, enrolment and access to student support facilities.  IMC’s staff is available to assist you personally during office hours.

Unit Description

This unit introduces students to basic statistical concepts and methods that are widely used in economics, finance, accountancy, marketing and, more generally, business. Unit topics include: descriptive statistics; probability distributions; point and interval estimation of parameters; hypothesis testing; and simple and multiple regression. In the computing segment of the unit, students will learn to solve statistical problems in an Excel spread-sheet environment.

Assumed Knowledge

This is the first year statistics unit and there is no prerequisite for this unit. However students should have a sound understanding on mathematical concepts. Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes (i.e. goals and objectives) of this unit are related to the learning outcomes of the overall course (or program) of study. In turn, both unit and course learning outcome are designed to enhance each student’s acquisition of desirable graduate attributes.  The table below shows the connections between learning outcomes and graduate attributes.

Unit Learning Outcomes Course Learning

Outcomes achieved

Graduate Attributes achieved
After successfully completing this unit students will be able to:    
1. Understand the general principles of sampling and student design. 1) Knowledge of business principles and their applications in global

contexts

3) Disciplinary knowledge and skills
2. Interpret questions that require statistical analysis and recognise the appropriate statistical procedure for application in each case. 2) Scrutinise and synthesise business information in diverse settings 4)  Critical thinking

5)  Problem solving

6)  Information Literacy

3. Use critical thinking and problem solving skills to deal with scenarios involving statistics. 2) Scrutinise and synthesise business information in diverse settings 4) Critical thinking 5) Problem solving
Unit Learning Outcomes Course Learning

Outcomes achieved

Graduate Attributes achieved
4. Summarise data graphically and numerically using appropriate techniques. 6) Develop and present arguments 4) Critical thinking 5) Problem solving
5. Use a statistical package to analyse data and answer research questions. Interpret statistical output and write up reports based on the output. 5) Use data for decisionmaking 5)  Problem solving

6)  Information Literacy

6. Work individually and in teams to produce statistical outcomes based on theory and practical exercises. 7) Integrate learnings in a personal work context 2) Personal and

professional development

4) Critical thinking

8) communication

 

Teaching Staff 

 

Lecturer: David Liu, email: david.liu@top.edu.au  

Class Times

 

Lectures: Tuesday, 09:30 am – 12:30 pm

Consultation: Tuesday, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

It is expected that you will be punctual in joining the online lectures. To access your online class, please go to the section for each week and click the Zoom meeting link.

You are expected to turn off your video camera and mute yourself unless the lecturer permits their use for teaching and learning purposes.

Teaching Strategy

 

The learning outcomes in this unit will be achieved through online learning resources in Moodle, Library resources and the availability of staff consultation. Achievement of learning outcomes requires you to prepare for each class, complete all assessment tasks and undertake adequate private study.

 

As a guide, you should expect to allocate 10 hours each week to study this unit adequately:

  • 3 hours of lectures/seminars/classes
  • 1 hours of tutorials
  • 6 hours of preparation and private study

Prescribed and Recommended Readings:  

 

Prescribed Textbook: 

Black, Ken (2014), Business Statistics for Contemporary Decision Making (8th), Wiley. ISBN-10:1118024117, ISBN-13: 978-1118024119

Recommended Reference Books and Journal Articles:

Lind A., Marchal G. & Wathen A. (2010), Basic Statistics for Business & Economics, 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, Australia.Levine, M, Berenson, L. & Stephan, D. (2008),

Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel, 5th ed., Pearson Prentice Hall N.J.

Keller, G. & Warrack, B. (2009), Statistics for Management and Economics, 8th ed., Duxbury Press, Pacific Grove, California

Berenson, et al (2010), Business Statistics, Pearson Prentice Hall

Sharpe, N., R. De Veaux and P. Velleman (2012), Business Statistics, 2nd Edition, Pearson.

Albright, C., Winston, L., and Zappe, C. (2009) Data Analysis and Decision Making with Microsoft Excel, Thomson South-Western.

DeGroot, M.H. & Schervish, M.J. (2010), Probability and Statistics, 4th. Ed. Reading, Mass. Addison-Wesley

Berenson, M., Levine, D., Krehbiel,T., Stephan, D., O’Brien, M., Jayne, N. & Watson, J (2012), Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications, Pearson Australia

Additional Resources:

 

Assessment Tasks: Summary

Assessment tasks are an integral part of the learning framework. Assessment tasks are designed to measure student progress in achieving competency in unit learning outcomes. Unless otherwise stated, the pass mark in each assessment task is 50%.

 

Assessment type 

 

 

Week assessment is due

 

Proportion of

total marks

 

Unit Learning

Outcomes assessed

 

10 x Online Tutorial Exercises Weeks 2 -11 10%

(1% for each)

1,   2,   3,   4
4 x Moodle Quizzes

 

Weeks 2 -11 20%

(5% for each)

1,2,3,   4,   5
Major Assignment

 

Week 10 20% 3,4,   5,   6
Final Examination Week 12 or 13 50% 1,2,3,4,   5

 

 

               

Assessment Tasks: Details

 

Assessment title 10 x Online Tutorial Exercises (10%) 
Purpose, description and topics covered

 

Purpose: The purpose of this assessment is to examine your understanding of the lecture and tutorial questions covered each week.

Description: Tutorial exercise will be available on Moodle after the lecture and tutorial for each week. Students can access the online tutorial questions at any time. Tutorial exercises will be closed at the end of the term. Question types include both multiple choice questions and calculation questions.

Topics to be covered: Week 1-10

 

Assessment length No time limited for each tutorial exercise. Students are expected to finish each tutorial exercise within 0.5 hours.

 

Criteria to grade quality The criteria includes:

•       Correct answers to multiple choice questions and calculation questions.

•       Accurate application of the knowledge gained in the lectures and tutorials

•       Problem solving individually and correctly to produce statistical outcomes

•       Correctly interpreting the statistical output and applying to the business cases

 

Submission method  

Online tutorial exercises. Students need to submit directly in Moodle.

Return method Marks will be added to Moodle after each exercise.
Feedback provided Answers to weekly tutorial questions/exercises will be discussed during tutorials. No other specific student feedback is provided.
   

 

             

 

Assessment title 4 x Moodle Quizzes (20%) 
Purpose, description and topics covered

 

Purpose: The purpose of this assessment is to examine your understanding of the lecture and tutorial covered each week. The aim of each quiz is to provide you with some early feedback about your progress in the unit.

 

Description: 

Four online Moodle Quizzes will be conducted on Moodle during the class time in Weeks 4, 6, 8 and 10. Question types include both multiple choice questions and calculation questions.

 

Topic to be covered: Week 1-10  

 

 

 

Assessment length  

It will be 1 hour duration.

Criteria to grade quality  

The criteria includes:

•       Correct answers to multiple choice questions and calculation questions.

•       Accurate application of the knowledge gained in the lectures and tutorials

•       Problem solving individually and correctly to produce statistical outcomes

•       Correctly interpreting the statistical output and applying to the business cases

 

 

Submission method Online tutorial exercises. Students need to submit directly in Moodle.
Return method Marks will be added to the Moodle after the quizzes.
Feedback provided  

 

             

 

Assessment title Individual Assignment (20%) 
Purpose, description and topics covered

 

Purpose: The purpose of this assessment is to:

•       Assess students’ knowledge and understand of statistical concepts, analysing, interpretation and presenting the results

•       Apply statistical concepts and methodologies in solving a realistic problem.

•       Develop valid and appropriate research questions and hypotheses, answerable using the provided data set

Description: Students will complete this assessment activity. This assignment requires each student to demonstrate an ability to present a sound argument showing appropriate research questions and hypotheses based on the material learned and to demonstrate ability to research and use credible references to aid the decision-making process and the presentation of the argument.

 

Assessment length  

The word length for this assignment is 1500 words excluding the list of references and appendices.

 

Criteria to grade quality The specific marking criteria/rubric is available on the subject’s Moodle Site. In general, the assignment rubric includes an assessment against the following areas:

1.     Organisation/Structure

2.     Subject Knowledge and Use of appropriate research questions and hypotheses

3.     Level of focus on the assigned topic and the assignment questions

4.     Appropriate linkage to two branches of statistical methods

5.     Research, referencing and language

       

Submission method Assignments must be submitted in Turnitin by the due date.

The signed IMC Cover Sheet must be included in the submitted file.

Students should review the Turnitin similarity result and where it is higher than 30% similarity, the students should review and reduce the result prior to submission by the due date.

Return method Marks will be added to the unit’s Moodle site
Feedback provided  

Provided using the assignment’s rubric

 

Assessment title Final Examination (50%) 
Purpose, description and topics covered

 

Purpose:

The purpose of this assessment is to test students’ knowledge in the context of the unit content covered during the term of the unit.

Description: 

The questions for the final examination will be sourced from any of the topics covered during the term of the unit. The questions will be developed using the prescribed text book. The structure of the final examination will be discussed in class before the end of the term.

Topics include:

•       Introduction to basic statistical concepts

•       Graphical descriptive techniques

•       Numerical descriptive techniques

•       Elementary probability theory, rules and applications

•       Random variables and discrete probability distributions

•       Continuous probability distributions

•       Introduction to sampling distributions

•       Introduction to estimation

•       Introduction to hypothesis testing

•       Simple linear regression and Correlation

 

Calculator. A basic scientific calculator is required for this unit. It must be able to perform logarithmic and exponential calculations

 

Assessment length  

It will be 3 hours duration with 10 multiple choice questions and 9 calculation questions.

 

Criteria to grade quality The criteria includes:

•       Correct answers to multiple choice questions

•       Accurate application of the knowledge gained in the lectures and tutorials

 

Submission method Exam.
Return method N/A
Feedback provided  

N/A

 

Assessment Tasks: General Information

  • Late submission of assignments: It is IMC policy that assignments cannot be submitted late without prior approval of the unit coordinator and only in extenuating circumstances supported by evidence. Assignments submitted late without prior approval will not be graded.
  • Sample final examination: Sample paper will be available online in the final week.
  • Group Work forms part of an assessment in this unit. Group work assessment tasks are important for students in developing skills including:
    • Teamwork and leadership;
    • Analysing, questioning and evaluating the work of others;
    • Collaborative skills such as conflict management, negotiation and justifying opinion; and
    • Time management and personal, organisational skills.

These skills are highly regarded by employers in professional settings and form part of the learning goals of the degree program.

Each student in a group will complete a Group Assignment Peer and Self-Assessment Form at the completion of the group work task. [Staff: delete item (c) if group work is not applicable to this unit. For guidance on adopting group work as a form of assessment, refer to the Unit Design Guidance Note #2 Group Work on Moodle. 

Schedule of Topics

  Topics Readings Special Instructions
Week 1 Introduction to basic statistical concepts and graphical descriptive techniques

 

Ch1 & 2  
Week 2 Graphical descriptive techniques II Ch2  
Week 3 Numerical descriptive techniques Ch3  
Week 4 Elementary probability theory, rules and applications Ch4

 

Quiz 1
Week 5 Random variables and discrete probability distributions

 

Ch5  

 

Week 6 Continuous probability

distributions: uniform distribution and normal distribution

Ch6 Quiz 2
Week 7 Introduction to sampling distributions

Introduction to estimation

Ch7  
Week 8 Introduction to estimation Ch8 Quiz 3
Week 9 Introduction to hypothesis testing and testing the population mean Ch9  
Week 10 Inference about two populations Ch10 Quiz 4, Assignment Due
Week 11 Simple linear regression and Correlation Ch12 Final Exam Revision
Week

12/13

FINAL EXAMINATION    
       

 

Tutorial or Weekly Assignments

 

 

Week 1  
Week 2  

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7

Week 3  

3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.7, 3.29, 3.48, 3.50

Week 4 4.1, 4.2, 4.8, 4.11, 4.19, 4.21, 4.27, 4.28, 4.40, 4.43, 4.45
Week 5  

6.5,        6.8,        6.11,      6.12,      6.27,      6.29

Week 6  

7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.8, 7.19a, 7.19d, 7.90, 7.97

Week 7 8.16, 8.19, 8.21, 8.28, 8.31, 8.32, 8.33, 8.35, 8.36, 8.44, 8.45, 8.50
Week 8 9.7, 9.15, 9.17, 9.52
Week 9 10.10, 10.23, 10.25, 10.26, 10.51, 10.53
Week 10 11.7, 11.8, 11.9, 11.28, 11.29, 11.30
Week 11 Final Exam Revision

Requirements to Pass the Unit

To achieve a passing grade in this unit a student must:

(a) Attempt all within-term assessment tasks to the satisfaction of the lecturer-in-charge; (b) Attend the final examination and submit a completed examination script; and  (c) Achieve an overall mark of at least 50% in the unit.

Grades

A final grade and mark will be awarded in the unit as follows:

 

Grade                                           %Mark

High Distinction (HD)                 85 – 100

Distinction (D)                              75 – 84

Credit (CR)                                  65 – 74

Pass (P)                                       50 – 64

Fail (F)*                                        00 – 49

 

*The alternate grades of Fail Absent, Fail Incomplete and Fail Withdrawn may be awarded in appropriate circumstances.

 

The definition and interpretation of the above grades can be found in Assessment Policy and Procedure (Coursework) on IMC’s website at http://www.top.edu.au/current-students/top-policiesand-procedures

Academic Integrity Module (AIM)

All IMC students are required to complete the Academic Integrity Module (AIM) before submitting their first assignment in their first unit of study (which may be this unit or another unit). AIM is an online module available through Moodle that introduces the principles of ethical academic practice and IMC’s values and expectations of correct academic conduct. There are no credit points awarded for completing AIM, but your successful completion of the module will be recorded on your Academic Record for future reference. If you have not completed AIM by week 6, your results for the assignment will be withheld. Students are asked to attach the email confirmation of successful completion to their first assignment.

 

Recent Changes to this Unit

The following recent changes have been made to improve and/or update this unit:

  • The participation marks (10%) have been changed to online tutorial exercises.
  • The mid-term exam (20%) have been changed to online quizzes in weeks 4, 6, 8 and 10.
  • Lectures in this term will be delivered online only.

 

Online Learning Support

 

A great deal of online learning support is provided. A list of subject-specific and general information guides containing the best databases and resources available are accessible via the Library website: library.top.edu.au. The online Library Course available on Moodle is useful for learning about available services and how to successfully conduct research. Many useful support materials can also be located within the Academic Skills Development Module on Moodle.

 

For more information or further support, please contact our English Language and Academic Skills Coordinator at learning@top.edu.au

 

Academic English Support Program

An extensive Academic English program is provided. This program is aimed at developing skills and understanding of the rules and conventions that form the basis of academic work. The program includes:

  • The Academic Skills Development Module (available on Moodle)
  • Academic English and Study Skills workshops held throughout the term
  • Individual consultations available by appointment
  • Academic English Support Guide (available via the online Library)

If you have any queries or would like to book a consultation, please contact our English

Language and Academic Skills Coordinator at learning@top.edu.au

Additional Tutorial Support

Support for this unit may be provided by IMC’s Duty Tutor who provides general assistance and personal advice on academic matters in a selection of undergraduate and postgraduate units. The Duty Tutor is available for consultation by contacting pass@top.edu.au[Staff: delete Duty

Tutor if this does not apply to your unit or this is a postgraduate unit]

Early Intervention for Students at Risk

 

Your performance within each teaching period will be monitored to assist you towards successful completion of the units in which you are enrolled. Students whose performance is such that they are deemed to be at risk of not successfully completing the unit will be identified through IMC’s early intervention strategy.  Indicators of students at risk of not successfully completing the unit include:

  • Not attending lectures and/or tutorials
  • Not performing adequately in assessment tasks
  • Lack of engagement in the learning process
  • Poor language skills

Where you are identified as being at risk of failure, you will be advised by IMC of an appropriate remedial strategy and provided access to support services appropriate to your needs.

Policy on Special Consideration for Examinations

 

Students may apply for a Special Consideration when they are unable to sit an examination or if their performance in the examination is severely affected by extraordinary circumstances beyond their control. Students are not allowed to decide whether they will sit an examination or not, they may only apply for special consideration when they have evidence that they could not sit for the exam (see below). Please note:

 

  • Misreading the examination timetable is not sufficient reason for the award of Special Consideration.
  • Sitting consecutive exams (e.g. two exams on one day) is not a sufficient reason for the awarding of Special Consideration.

 

Acceptable evidence of a student’s inability to sit an exam, or a severe adverse effect on their performance in an examination, include a stamped medical certificate with the date of consultation, the state or extent of the medical condition, and the period covered by the doctor’s certificate. IMC administration staff will contact the medical professional’s office to verify the authenticity of the certificate. Only medical certificates that involved a personal (not online) consultation with a medical professional will be accepted.

 

An application form for Special Consideration is available from Moodle. Applications for Special Consideration must be received by the IMC Academic Administration Office no later than five (5) working days after the last day of the examination period.

 

If Special Consideration is deemed to apply in a final examination, in normal circumstances a student will be permitted to sit a Supplementary Examination. For mid-term exams, the unit coordinator has the discretion to determine how Special Consideration, if granted, will be applied.

A student can take only one supplementary examination in this unit each term.

Re-sit Assessment Task

If a student has achieved an overall mark between 40% and 49%, or a Fail Incomplete grade with an aggregate mark of at least 40%, a re-sit assessment task may be prescribed by the lecturerin-charge to determine whether acceptable competency in expected learning outcomes has been achieved. The assessment will typically be in the form of a re-sit final examination but might be another form of re-sit assessment if the student has performed satisfactorily in the first attempt at the final examination.

Student Satisfaction Survey

 

At the end of each term, students will be asked to complete a Student Satisfaction Survey.  Student responses will assist IMC and its teaching staff in making improvements to teaching and learning content and processes.  The survey will include questions about unit content, the assessment system, teaching quality and other items. Students will also have an opportunity to make open-ended comments. Student evaluations are important to IMC and are taken seriously. All student evaluations are anonymous to ensure privacy.

 

Academic Misconduct

 

(a) Plagiarism

 

Plagiarism is the use of another person’s ideas or work without appropriate acknowledgement or credit. Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional.

 

Intentional plagiarism is deliberately using text, ideas or concepts attributable to another person obtained from any source (including internet sources) without referencing the author and the publication. Intentional plagiarism is a serious matter, amounting to academic fraud. Student work established and proven as containing intentional plagiarism will result in a zero grade and be reported to the Dean of School. The student’s enrolment in the unit will be reviewed.

 

Unintentional plagiarism may occur if you do not understand appropriate ways of acknowledging sourced reference materials. If you are unsure, you should consult the lecturer, IMC’s academic skills coordinator and available publications to learn how to reference appropriately.

 

All written assignments must be submitted online through the Turnitin anti-plagiarism software (unless otherwise advised by the lecturer). The link for Turnitin can be found on IMC’s Moodle site.

 

  • Cheating

 

Cheating is an attempt to gain an unfair advantage over other students. Cheating includes copying, plagiarism and third-party assistance in preparing assignments. All work submitted must be a student’s own work. In an exam, cheating includes communicating with anyone other than supervisors during the exam period and the use of dictionaries, electronic devices, books or notes in the exam room where these not authorised. Cheating in any form will not be tolerated at IMC. Any student caught cheating on an examination will be given a FAIL grade in that unit, and the incident will be reported to the Dean of School for further action.

  • Third party assistance

 

Academic misconduct includes the submission of work that has been prepared or assisted by a third party (e.g. through the purchase of assignment submissions). Where a lecturer has evidence that a submitted assignment is not the student’s own work, the lecturer may interview the student to ascertain whether third-party assistance has been obtained and, if so, report the incident to Dean of School for further action to be determined.

Students are required to read and understand IMC’s Academic Integrity Policy and ensure that all the work complies with the policy before submitting assessments. The policy is available at http://www.top.edu.au/current-students/top-policies-and-procedures

 

 

IMC – GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES

IMC has identified and articulated three core attributes in the curriculum design and learning outcomes of its graduates. They are Integrity, Capability, and Responsibility. The following graduate attributes, aligned to the core attributes, provide a statement of the graduate qualities that will be developed in IMC students through course design and implementation. Each course of study and each unit in a course will have learning outcomes that are designed to develop the following graduate attributes.

 

Graduate Attributes Interpretations

Attributes in the context of higher education

Descriptors

Map with CLOs and ULOs

Integrity 1. Act honestly, ethically and morally in professional and personal contexts. 1. Ethics and professionalism
2. Manage personal and professional development to maintain contemporary discipline knowledge and skills 2. Personal and professional development
Capability 3. Apply discipline knowledge, principles, concepts and skills 3. Discipline knowledge and skills
4. Think critically, analytically, creatively and reflectively 4. Thinking and reasoning
5. Solve problems and make sound decisions based on theoretical

foundations and discipline-specific knowledge

5. Problem-solving and decision-making
6. Apply interpersonal skills to work constructively as a team member 6. Teamwork
7. Communicate effectively in personal and professional contexts 7. Communication
8. Engage with transformative digital technologies 8. Digital technologies
Curiosity 9. Commit to continuous learning and intellectual curiosity 9. Curiosity and learning
10. Derive knowledge through systematic and scientific methods of enquiry 10. Research and enquiry
Responsibility 11. Apply knowledge and skills in a manner that demonstrates national, international and intercultural awareness and understanding 11. Global perspective and cultural understanding
12. Take leadership roles in the workplace and community, and engage constructively on local, national and global issues 12. Leadership and engagement

 

 

 

IMC – COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

BACHELOR OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

 

  Learning Outcomes for the Course Short form descriptor of course learning outcome 

(for use in unit outlines)

KNOWLEDGE

 

Graduates will have:

 

 

1. Deep and broad knowledge of management and business disciplines  (management major) Knowledge of  management and

business disciplines

2. Deep and broad knowledge of accounting and related fields within an international business contexts Knowledge of accounting and related disciplines
3. Knowledge of business principles as applied in national and global contexts, and informed by wider social, economic, cultural and political factors. Knowledge of business principles and their applications in global

contexts

SKILLS

 

Graduates will be able to:

4. Review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise business information, issues and challenges in diverse social, economic, cultural and political business settings. Scrutinise and synthesise business information in diverse settings
5. Analyse business data to draw independent conclusions and make informed and evidencebased decisions about business problems in local and global workplace environments. Use data for decisionmaking
6. Present well-informed, persuasive, reasoned and coherent arguments in both individual and collaborative communications in diverse social, economic, cultural and political settings. Develop and present arguments
APPLICATION

OF

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

 

Graduates will be able to:

7. Integrate discipline knowledge and research skills with practice to analyse, evaluate and solve business issues and challenges and to promote the transition to work and career development. Integrate learnings in a personal work context
8. Consider the ethical, social, cultural and environmental implications of business practices and plan independent responses to these practices. Develop personal responses to diverse business practices
9. Act responsibly and with accountability in the workplace to underpin professional development and career-related life-long learning Demonstrate and defend personal learning and practice in international business