Law for Commerce Mini Case Studies

Description

The purpose of the assignment is to introduce you to the discipline-specific skill of legal reasoning.  Part A of the assessment (Multi-selection Quiz) will introduce you to the IRAC (Issue; Rule; Application; Conclusion) Formula, and provide a foundation from which you will then be expected to formulate your own written answers to legal problems (hypothetical fact situations – HFS) posed in Part B.  You will be presented with similar legal problem questions (HFS) throughout the course of the unit and ultimately in the exam.

This assessment is the first step in acquiring the skill of legal argumentation, which is set as a discipline-specific skill with which to enhance your critical faculties and writing abilities, as well as provide a deeper understanding of the workings of law for commerce.   It is important that your discussion focuses on analysing the facts of the hypothetical problem and applying the law to those facts. Marks will be awarded for your identification of the issues and the material facts that are relevant to those issues; your identification of the law that applies to those facts and issues; and most importantly, the application and analysis of the law as it applies to those facts and issues. Generalised statements of legal principles – that is, those that are not sufficiently relevant to the facts – will attract only limited marks.  It is also expected that you observe tertiary level academic writing standards – organise your writing in proper paragraphs, with correct grammar, punctuation and spelling.

Please ensure that you read all of the instructions contained in this document.

Specific Requirements

Your task is to provide solutions to the legal issues posed in the mini case studies, drawing on the legal principles covered in Topics 1 and 2. This assessment is based on your course materials for Topics 1 and 2. It is NOT a research task. The materials you should refer to when preparing your answers include the textbook, study guide, Powerpoint slides, and cases referred to in the materials.  However, do not cite or reference Powerpoint slides, the study guide or textbookCite relevant cases and legislation only.  In other words, when you cite a case name, you need not cite the page from the textbook, study guide, or Powerpoint slides.

 

There are TWO Parts to this assessment.  The first Part A (5%) is an online Multi-Selection Quiz

(MSQ) aimed at familiarising you with the IRAC method of answering problem questions. The MSQ will be available on the MLC101 CloudDeakin site in the Assessments folder until the due date and time.  It is a PRE-REQUISITE to complete this Quiz before you are able to submit Part B (15%). In other words, the Assessment One (Part B) Dropbox in the Assessments folder will not open if you have not completed Part A.

 

The overall word count for the mini case studies in Part B is 700 words. However, a leeway of 50 words is given. In other words, your total word count must not exceed 750 words. The minimum word count is 400 words in total. You may be penalised if you do not meet the minimum or if you exceed the maximum word count. Note: The word count does not include headings.

 

Referencing

For Assessment One, you are not required to provide a Reference List. Cite relevant cases and legislation (if applicable) in your answer. However, you must comply with the usual legal conventions regarding the italicisation of case names and full case citations with the year and reporting reference. For example, Carlill v Carbolic Smoke Ball Co [1893] 1 QB 256. Similarly, Acts of Parliament must be italicised. For example, Property Law Act 1958 (Vic).

Format

  • You do not need to provide a cover sheet.
  • Use IRAC (taught in the seminars).
  • Use font size 12 point and line spacing of 1.5.
  • Use Calibri font.
  • Use margin 2.54 cm on all sides.
  • You must provide a word count at the beginning of your assessment. All pages of the assessment must be numbered and your student ID number included in the header or footer of each page.
  • You must ensure that your writing, punctuation, spelling and grammar are of a satisfactory standard.

Learning Outcome Details for this Assessment

This task allows you to demonstrate achievement towards the unit learning outcomes. The ULOs are aligned with specific graduate learning outcomes – that is, the skills and knowledge that graduates are expected to have upon completion of their studies – and this assessment task is an important tool in determining achievement of those outcomes.

If you do not demonstrate achievement of the unit learning outcomes, you will not be successful in this unit.

It is good practice to familiarise yourself with the ULOs and GLOs, as they provide guidance on the knowledge, understanding and skills you are expected to demonstrate upon completion of the unit. In this way they can be used to guide your study.

Unit Learning Outcome (ULO) Graduate Learning Outcome (GLO)
ULO1: Apply key principles of law for

commerce to recognise and evaluate legal issues.

GLO1: Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities

GLO4: Critical Thinking

ULO2: Analyse and interpret legal issues in domestic and international contexts. GLO1: Discipline-specific knowledge and capabilities

GLO4: Critical Thinking

 

 

Submission Instructions

The due date and time for this assessment is 8:00 pm (Melbourne time) on Friday 4th December, 2020. Part A must be completed in CloudDeakin (Quiz section under Assessments) and you are to submit Part B of your Assessment One in the individual Assignment Dropbox in the MLC101 CloudDeakin unit site on or before the due date.

When uploading your assignment, name your document using the following syntax: <your surname_your first name_your Deakin student ID number_[unitcode].doc (or ‘.docx’). For example, ‘Teh Kim 123456789 MLC101.doc’.

Your assessment should be submitted in Microsoft Word (or rich text) format – .doc, .docx or .rtf. Please do not submit your assessment in PDF format, Apple Pages format, or in any other format. It is your responsibility to ensure that the file you submit can be downloaded by the marker. Files that cannot be opened will be treated as non-submissions and the usual late penalties will apply. Additionally, please take care to ensure that you have submitted the right version of the file (i.e., your final version, and not a draft version) and that you have submitted the assessment for this unit (and have not mistakenly submitted an assessment that was written for another unit).

Submitting a hard copy of this assignment is not required.

You must keep a backup copy of every assignment you submit until the marked assignment has been returned to you.  In the unlikely event that one of your assignments is misplaced, you will need to submit your backup copy.

Any work you submit may be checked by electronic or other means for the purposes of detecting collusion and/or plagiarism. If you are caught plagiarising or colluding, you will receive 0% for your assignment.

When you submit an assignment through your CloudDeakin unit site, you will receive an email to your Deakin email address confirming that it has been submitted. You should check that you can see your assignment in the Submissions view of the Assignment Dropbox folder after upload, and check for, and keep, the email receipt for the submission.

If you are encountering last minute technical problems and are unable to submit your assignment on CloudDeakin, please email your assignment to the Unit Chair, Dr Kim Teh (kim.teh@deakin.edu.au) to demonstrate that the assignment has been submitted on time; however, you are still required to submit the assignment on CloudDeakin once it becomes available. Please seek the assistance of IT support if you are having trouble submitting online.

If you have already submitted your assignment on CloudDeakin but wish to submit an updated submission, that is acceptable so long as the most recent copy is submitted before the submission deadline. The latest submission will replace any earlier submissions.

Marking and Feedback

Marking Criteria

Assessment One is worth 20% of your final grade for this unit. Part A (5%) is a Multi-selection Quiz that must be completed online in CloudDeakin.  Part B (15%) is a written response submission marked out of 15 (7.5 marks for each mini case study HFS) and will be assessed against the following criteria:

  • Identification of the issues
  • Identification of the applicable legal rules (principles of law derived from cases and statutes)
  • Analysis of the facts and application of the law to the facts
  • Conclusion

 

You will receive an individual mark for each of these four criteria (along with organisation, communication, and style) for each of the two case studies in Part B, which will then be added together with your results from Part A. These criteria will be applied by way of a marking rubric, which can be found in the Assessment Resources – Assessment One folder.

 

It is always a useful exercise to familiarise yourself with the criteria before completing any assessment task. Criteria act as a boundary around the task and help identify what assessors are specifically looking for in your submission. The criteria are drawn from the unit’s learning outcomes, ensuring they align with appropriate graduate attributes.

 

Identifying the standard you aim to achieve is also a useful strategy for success and to that end, familiarising yourself with the descriptor for that standard is highly recommended.

 

Feedback

Your marked assessment will be returned to you within 15 working days of submission (i.e., 8th January 2021, excluding the intra-trimester break), unless otherwise advised – with feedback provided in Turnitin or in the feedback box. Please take the opportunity to consider the feedback you have received and to think about how you might use that feedback to improve on future assessments (or, hopefully, to keep doing the things that you have been doing well).

Your marked assessment may contain a range of positive and negative feedback. The purpose of this feedback is to help you learn from your submission. Sometimes, feedback will be given for this educational purpose even though it is not related to a matter taken into account in marking on this occasion. It is not necessarily the case that every item of positive feedback is something that you ‘gained marks’ for, or that every item of negative feedback is something that you ‘lost marks’ for. Sometimes, we are merely helping you learn for the future.

Extensions

No extensions will be granted unless there are exceptional and most unusual circumstances outside the student’s control. 

Students who require a time extension should submit a written request to the Unit Chair, supported with documentation (for example, medical certificate). Such requests should be emailed to the Unit Chair. Requests for extensions will not be considered after 12 noon, 4th  December 2020. Note: The Unit Chair may require you to submit a copy of your draft assignment with your application if it is made very close to the due date. Extension requests after the due date must be made to the Faculty through Student Connect – Special Consideration.

If an extension is granted, the period of the extension will be commensurate to the circumstances which have affected the completion of your assessment. For example, if you were affected by a medical condition for three days, you would expect that the extension granted would be three days. This means that if you submit an extension request, we do not expect you to provide information to us that is sensitive and thus inappropriate to be disclosed, but we do expect you to be able to provide us with an adequate explanation of the circumstances that have led to your extension request. If you do not explain those circumstances, it is not possible to grant an extension, as it is not possible to make a judgement of the extent to which the completion of your assessment has been affected. The maximum extension period that can be granted is two weeks.

Late Submission

The following marking penalties will apply if you submit an assessment task after the due date without an approved extension: 5% will be deducted from available marks for each day up to five days, and work that is submitted more than five days after the due date will not be marked and will receive 0% for the task.

‘Day’ means working day for paper submissions and calendar day for electronic submissions. The Unit Chair may refuse to accept a late submission where it is unreasonable or impracticable to assess the task after the due date.

Calculation of the late penalty is as follows:  

  • 1 day late: submitted after 8:00 pm on 4 December (Friday) but before 8 pm 5 December (Saturday) – 5% penalty (0.75 mark).
  • 2 days late: submitted after 8 pm 5 December (Saturday) but before 6 December (Sunday) 8 pm – 10% penalty (1.5 marks).
  • 3 days late: submitted after 8 pm 6 December (Sunday) but before 7 December (Monday) 8 pm – 15% penalty (2.25 marks).
  • 4 days late: submitted after 8 pm 7 December (Monday) but before 8 December (Tuesday) 8 pm – 20% penalty (3 marks).
  • 5 days late: submitted after 8 pm 8 December (Tuesday) but before 9 December (Wednesday) 8 pm – 25% penalty (3.75 marks).

Dropbox closes on 9 December (Wednesday) at 8 pm Melbourne time.

Support

The Division of Student Life (see link below) provides all students with editing assistance. Students who wish to take advantage of this service must be organised and plan ahead and contact the Division of Student Life in order to schedule a booking, well in advance of the due date of this assignment. http://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/administrativedivisions/student-life

Referencing

Any material used in this assignment that is not your original work must be acknowledged as such and appropriately referenced. You can find information about plagiarism and other study support resources at the following website: http://www.deakin.edu.au/students/study-support

Academic Misconduct

For information about academic misconduct, special consideration, extensions, and assessment feedback, please refer to the document Your rights and responsibilities as a student in this Unit in the first folder next to the Unit Guide in the Resources area of the CloudDeakin unit site.

ASSIGNMENT QUESTIONS

PART A – MULTI-SELECTION QUIZ (MSQ)

The MSQ is posted in CloudDeakin in the Assessments Tab in the Quizzes Folder. (5 marks)

  • Read the information in the Quiz carefully.
  • DO NOT submit all your answers until you are certain of the selections you wish to make. You can save your responses, exit the Quiz and return to it later if you wish, but once you submit, you cannot change your answers.
  • It is not multiple-choice, so there may be more than one correct answer (there may be two, or three or even more correct answers).
  • You will lose a percentage of each mark if you select an incorrect response, or fail to select a correct response. In other words, choose carefully.
  • YOU MUST SUBMIT PART A’S QUIZ BEFORE THE ASSESSMENT FOLDER WILL OPEN FOR YOU TO SUBMIT PART B.
  • READ ALL THE FEEDBACK FOR THE MSQ CAREFULLY, AND REFER TO THIS FEEDBACK WHEN YOU WRITE YOUR ANSWERS TO PART B.

 

 

PART B – WRITTEN RESPONSE SUBMISSIONS (15 MARKS)

 

CASE STUDY 1 (7.5 MARKS)

In August 2020, the Commonwealth Parliament passes the Mobile Phone Bullying (Protection of Children) Act 2020. (Note: This Act is a fictional Act.)

During the second reading of the bill, the Minister informed Parliament that the proposed new Act will prevent cyberbullying and prohibit the use of mobile phones by primary school children to send abusive text messages to their schoolmates.

Mobile Phone Bullying (Protection of Children) Act 2020

No 28, 2020

 

Long title: An Act to Protect Primary School Children from Bullying through use of Mobile Phones

[Assented to 28 August 2020]

 

The Parliament of Australia enacts:

 

  1. Short title

This Act may be cited as the Mobile Phone Bullying (Protection of Children) Act 2020.

 

  1. Sale or provision of mobile phones with consent

Any shopkeeper, retailer or wholesaler who sells or provides a mobile phone to a child under the age of thirteen years without first obtaining the written consent of the child’s parent or guardian shall be guilty of an offence.

Fact scenario: 

Oscar sells mobile phones in a shop. Twelve-year-old Ralph wishes to purchase a mobile phone as a birthday present for his grandmother. Oscar refuses to sell a phone to Ralph without the written consent of a parent or guardian. On 1 October 2020, Ralph forges a letter from his mother and Oscar sells him a phone.

Applying the rules of statutory interpretation, has Oscar committed an offence under the Mobile Phone Bullying (Protection of Children) Act 2020? Why/Why not?

 

 

 

 

CASE STUDY 2 (7.5 MARKS)

 

Tilly has been running a small hobby business selling hand-made jewellery on e-bay. Her good friend Jassie is also very artistic and makes personalised greetings cards, which are also sold online. Both girls have been doing well and have struggled to keep up with the many orders, given that they are both students just completing their degrees. When they finish their respective courses, they agree that they should team up and form a business together, specialising in custom-made artwork and jewellery, but moving beyond online sales to include market stalls and a small retail outlet in town.

 

Realising they need some form of written agreement to clarify how expenses and income should be shared, they ask their friend Maisie, who has just completed her law degree, to prepare a document that sets out respective responsibilities and their rights, particularly in terms of profit sharing. They both sign copies, and a third copy is lodged with Maisie for safekeeping.

 

All goes well and together they build up a vibrant little business that produces a healthy income, such that they can employ Nathan, a young graduate, to look after all the administrative duties for them. After 18 months, though, they have an almighty row, mainly about their rival affections for Nathan. Tilly, furious with Jassie, storms out and sets up a rival operation. In the first six months, it does extremely well, and since Tilly also starts marketing her own greetings cards to add to the jewellery part of the business, she captures most of the orders that previously went to the original business. Jassie has enormous problems, because she is losing money and is also unable to employ Nathan anymore.

 

Jassie wishes to take action against Tilly for not fulfilling her obligations. Tilly says they only went into business as friends and there was no intention of having a binding contractual agreement. She said that if she had wanted that sort of agreement, she would have gone to a solicitor in the first place.

 

Did Jassie and Tilly intend to create a binding agreement? Why/Why not?

 

Please use relevant case law to support your answer.

 

T3 2020 MLC101 Assessment One: Part B Rubric

 

Performance Levels/Criteria N (0-29) N (30-49) P (50-59) C (60-69) D (70-79) HD (80-100)
Case Study One        
Identification of legal issues, ULO1, GLO1,

(15 marks)

2.2 points

 

Very few or no legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are either incomplete, or unclearly and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

 

(0-4.4 marks)

6 points

 

A few legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are either incomplete, or unclearly and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

 

(4.5-7.4 marks)

8.2 points

 

An adequate number of legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are explained reasonably clearly, but are incomplete and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

 

(7.5-8.9 marks)

9.7 points

 

Most legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed reasonably clearly and completely, with some minor inaccuracies.

 

 

(9-10.4 marks)

11.2 points

 

Almost all legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed clearly and completely, with very minor inaccuracies.

 

 

 

(10.5-11.9 marks)

15 points

 

All legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed fully, clearly, with only very minor inaccuracies or are precisely and accurately defined.

 

 

(12-15 marks)

 

 

Identification of the legal rules. Defines the correct principles of law and cites legal rules (cases and/or statutory provisions) relevant to the factual problem,

ULO1, GLO1,

(25 marks)

3.7 points

 

Legal rules/principles of law are not identified, or if identified are incomplete or inaccurate.

 

 

 

 

(0-7.4 marks)

10 points

 

Very few legal rules/principles of law identified.

 

The legal rules identified are irrelevant, incomplete or inaccurate.

 

(7.5-12.4 marks)

13.7 points

 

Some relevant legal rules/principles of law identified.

 

The legal rules identified are reasonably clear and accurate.

 

 

(12.5-14.9 marks)

16.2 points

 

The main relevant

legal

rules/principles of law are identified and defined with clarity, but with minor inaccuracy.

 

 

 

(15-17.4 marks)

18.7 points

 

Almost all the relevant legal rules/principles of law are identified and defined clearly and accurately.

 

 

 

 

(17.5-19.9 marks)

25 points

 

Almost all or all the relevant legal rules/principles of law identified and thoroughly defined with concise, precise accuracy.

 

 

 

(20-25 marks)

 

 

Application/analysis of legal rules to the factual problems,

ULO2, GLO4,

(40 marks)

6 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law is either absent or unintelligible.

 

 

(0-11.9 marks)

16 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law is unclear, incomplete and/or inaccurate.

 

 

(12-19.9 marks)

22 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law demonstrates basic

understanding, but lacks clarity, completeness, and/or accuracy. (20-23.9 marks)

26 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law is clear and accurate but lacks completeness.

 

 

(24-27.9 marks)

30 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law is clear, accurate and complete, with very minor flaws.

 

(28-31.9 marks)

40 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the law is thorough and concisely expressed, with very minor or no flaws.

 

(32-40 marks)

 

Conclusion, ULO2, GLO4, (10 marks) 1.5 points

 

No conclusion or conclusion is unintelligible or without justification.

 

 

 

 

(0-2.9 marks)

4 points

 

Conclusion lacks justification and/or is expressed unclearly.

 

The conclusion conflicts with the analysis.

 

(3-4.9 marks)

5.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, but incomplete and inaccurate.

 

Conclusion at times conflicts with the analysis.

 

(5-5.9 marks)

6.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, with adequate clarity, but is incomplete with minor inaccuracies.

 

 

(6-6.9 marks)

7.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, clear and complete, with very minor inaccuracies.

 

 

 

 

(7-7.9 marks)

10 points

 

Conclusion is clear and concise, thoroughly justified and applied with very minor or no errors.

 

 

 

(8-10 marks)

 

Organisation, communication and style, (10 marks) 1.5 points

 

Very poorly organised.

 

Writing, grammar and

spelling incomprehensible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(0-2.9 marks)

4 points

 

Poorly organised.

 

Writing, grammar and spelling are at an unsatisfactory level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3-4.9 marks)

5.5 points

 

Satisfactorily organised.

 

Writing does not flow well.

 

Grammar and spelling are at a satisfactory level.

 

Several errors are present.

 

(5-5.9 marks)

6.5 points

 

Good organisation.

 

Writing mostly flowed well.

 

Grammar and

spelling are of a good standard.

 

Few errors are evident.

 

 

(6-6.9 marks)

7.5 points

 

Very good organisation.

 

Writing flowed clearly and coherently.

 

Grammar and spelling are of a high standard with very few errors present.

 

 

 

(7-7.9 marks)

10 points

 

Excellent organisation.

 

Exceptional flow, with excellent clarity and coherence.

 

Grammar and spelling are exemplary, with very few or no errors.

 

 

 

(8-10 marks)

 

Case Study Two
Identification of legal issues, ULO1, GLO1,

(15 marks)

2.2 points

 

Very few or no legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are either incomplete, or unclearly and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

(0-4.4 marks)

6 points

 

A few legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are either incomplete, or unclearly and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

(4.5-7.4 marks)

8.2 points

 

An adequate number of legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are explained reasonably clearly, but are incomplete and/or inaccurately expressed.

 

(7.5-8.9 marks)

9.7 points

 

Most legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed reasonably clearly and completely, with some minor inaccuracies.

 

(9-10.4 marks)

11.2 points

 

Almost all legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed clearly and completely, with very minor inaccuracies.

 

 

(10.5-11.9 marks)

15 points

 

All legal issues identified.

 

The issues identified are expressed fully, clearly, with only very minor inaccuracies or are precisely and accurately defined.

 

(12-15 marks)

Identification of the legal rules. Defines the correct principles of law and cites legal rules (cases and/or statutory provisions) relevant to the factual problem,

ULO1, GLO1,

(25 marks)

3.7 points

 

Legal rules/principles of law are not identified, or if identified are incomplete or inaccurate.

 

No case law to support the legal rule.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(0-7.4 marks)

10 points

 

Very few legal rules/principles of law identified.

 

The legal rules identified are irrelevant, incomplete or inaccurate.

 

Very few cases cited to support the legal rules or those selected are irrelevant.

 

(7.5-12.4 marks)

13.7 points

 

Some relevant legal rules/principles of law identified.

 

The legal rules identified are reasonably clear and accurate.

 

Some relevant cases cited to support the legal rules, but some cases are of questionable relevance.

 

(12.5-14.9 marks)

 

16.2 points

 

The main relevant

legal

rules/principles of law are identified and defined with clarity, but with minor inaccuracy.

 

Most of the cases cited to support the legal rules. Few cases are of questionable relevance.

 

 

(15-17.4 marks)

18.7 points

 

Almost all the relevant legal rules/principles of law are identified and defined clearly and accurately.

 

Almost all cases cited to support the legal rules.

 

The cases provisions are all relevant.

 

 

 

(17.5-19.9 marks)

25 points

 

Almost all or all the relevant legal rules/principles of law identified and thoroughly defined with concise, precise accuracy.

 

Almost all or all cases cited to support the legal rules.

 

All cases are relevant and almost all or all are exactly on point.

 

(20-25 marks)

Application/analysis of legal rules to the factual problems,

ULO2, GLO4,

(40 marks)

6 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law is either

16 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law is

22 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law demonstrates

26 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law is clear

30 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law is clear,

40 points

 

Analysis/application of the elements of the case law is

  absent or unintelligible.

 

 

 

(0-11.9 marks)

unclear, incomplete and/or inaccurate.

 

 

 

(12-19.9 marks)

basic understanding, but lacks clarity, completeness, and/or accuracy.

 

(20-23.9 marks)

and accurate but lacks completeness.

 

 

 

(24-27.9 marks)

accurate and complete, with very minor flaws.

 

 

(28-31.9 marks)

thorough and concisely expressed, with very minor or no flaws.

 

(32-40 marks)

Conclusion, ULO2, GLO4, (10 marks) 1.5 points

 

No conclusion or conclusion is unintelligible or without justification.

 

 

 

 

(0-2.9 marks)

4 points

 

Conclusion lacks justification and/or is expressed unclearly.

 

The conclusion conflicts with the analysis.

 

(3-4.9 marks)

5.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, but incomplete and inaccurate.

 

Conclusion at times conflicts with the analysis.

 

(5-5.9 marks)

6.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, with adequate clarity, but is incomplete with minor inaccuracies.

 

 

(6-6.9 marks)

7.5 points

 

Conclusion is justified, clear and complete, with very minor inaccuracies.

 

 

 

 

(7-7.9 marks)

10 points

 

Conclusion is clear and concise, thoroughly justified and applied with very minor or no errors.

 

 

 

(8-10 marks)

Organisation, communication and style, (10 marks) 1.5 points

 

Very poorly organised.

 

Writing, grammar and

spelling incomprehensible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(0-2.9 marks)

4 points

 

Poorly organised.

 

Writing, grammar and spelling are at an unsatisfactory level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3-4.9 marks)

5.5 points

 

Satisfactorily organised.

 

Writing does not flow well.

 

Grammar and spelling are at a satisfactory level.

 

Several errors are present.

 

(5-5.9 marks)

6.5 points

 

Good organisation.

 

Writing mostly flowed well.

 

Grammar and

spelling are of a good standard.

 

Few errors are evident.

 

 

(6-6.9 marks)

7.5 points

 

Very good organisation.

 

Writing flowed clearly and coherently.

 

Grammar and spelling are of a high standard with very few errors present.

 

 

 

(7-7.9 marks)

10 points

 

Excellent organisation.

 

Exceptional flow, with excellent clarity and coherence.

 

Grammar and spelling are exemplary, with very few or no errors.

 

 

 

(8-10 marks)

Overall 200 N

0 or above

N

60 or above

P

100 or above

C

120 or above

D

140 or above

HD

160 or above