Nutrition in the Wilderness

Nutrition in the Wilderness

Having explored backcountry medical concerns over the past three weeks, we should have seen a continuing trend of proper planning and preparation as the primary preventative practice (the 6 Ps) for nearly all medical concerns (and other identifiable risks). Another more specific topic that we should have identified, is that of proper nutrition and hydration.

Your body works most efficiently when it has stores of energy readily available to use. Proper hydration and nutrition allow your body (and brain) to work at their highest capacity.

This week please read the following article- Nutrition in the Wilderness_An Exploration of the Nutritional Requirements of Backcountry Travelers.pdf

Supplement your reading with your own exploration of internet sources (blogs such as- https://blog.nols.edu/2015/07/02/what-you-should-be-eating-in-the-backcountry (Links to an external site.)) (info sheets- https://www.pcta.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/204-Backcountry-Nutrition-Myths-Facts-Quiz-Answer-Key.pdf (Links to an external site.)).

After you have completed the readings create a three-day backcountry menu that you could use on your next trip. Your menu should list the DAY, FOOD ITEMS, and CALORIC VALUE for BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, and SNACKS. (Example- Capture.JPG)

Please create this menu as if you are in the backcountry, away from the amenities and services of the front country. For example, you may have a camp stove or open fire, but probably do not have an ice chest. Or make the argument that you are backpacking in the snow, to a backcounty hut (https://www.backpackerspantry.com/blog/7-best-backcountry-wilderness-huts-in-america (Links to an external site.)) and you may be able to keep food cold, and cook over a stove. Ground your pragmatic decision in reality, with a flair of imagination in planning for this potential trip.

Post your menu below to share your creative ideas with the rest of the class