Realist and a constructivist are discussing whether international organisations can influence state behaviour. Which arguments could each side make, and which examples could they cite?

 

  • title: realist and a constructivist are discussing whether international organisations can influence state behaviour. Which arguments could each side make, and which examples could they cite?

requirements

  • Try to answer the question as directly as you can.
  • Make sure you reference adequately and properly: you will lose points if you do not. See Learn for further guidance.
  • Your essay should not exceed 2000 words (including footnotes or endnotes, but excluding the bibliography).it. However, you should note that shorter essays are less likely to achieve the required depth and that this will be reflected in your mark.
  • Set the format to line spacing 1.5 and font size 11 or 12. Be conservative in terms of font choices。

Speaking from experience, students worry too much about certain things (referencing

style, formatting) and not enough about others (justifying the approach, making clear

arguments, writing an actual answer).

If the question seems a bit vague, it is likely on purpose to allow you to choose your own

approach. Make that choice, justify it briefly, and plow ahead.

You are not writing an opinion piece. While your evaluation has its place, it should be

based on your analysis, which should be backed up by sources.

Justify the approach you’re taking in your answer, even if it’s just in a sentence or two –

why is what you’re doing a good idea?

When you feel like you’re over-explaining what you’re doing, you’re probably explaining

just about enough.

You will hear “you’re not critical enough” when you’re just importing everything your

sources say without much comment.

Don’t only present evidence supporting your arguments/hypotheses to prove you/they

are right. Disproving theories (i.e. showing that they don’t work) is equally valid.

 

 

reading

realist:

Jørgensen, K. (2017) International Relations Theory. Macmillan. Ch. 5 “The Realist

Tradition”.

 

  • Mearsheimer, J.J. (1994) ‘The False Promise of International Institutions’,

International Security, 19 (3), 5-49.

 

 

 

constructivists:

Burchill, S., Linklater, A. and R. Devetek (2013) Theories of International Relations.

Macmillan. Ch. 9 “Constructivism”

 

Wendt, A. (1995) ‘Constructing International Politics’, International Security, 20(1), 71-81.

 

Hopf, T. (1998). ‘The Promise of Constructivism in International Relations Theory’,

International Security 23(1), 171-200.